Sixty years of Wash waders

wwrg tt balance

Weighing a Turnstone

The Wash Wader Ringing Group (WWRG) started with a bang on 18 August 1959, when the team made a catch of 1,132 birds in a Wildfowl Trust rocket-net at Terrington, in Norfolk. Over the years, cannon have replaced rockets, catches have become generally smaller and the scientific priorities have been refined, but the Group continues to focus upon discovering more about the waders that use the Wash. This blog attempts to summarises what has been learnt about the waders that rely upon the Wash, the vast muddy estuary that lies between Lincolnshire and Norfolk, on the east coast of England.

Sixty years ago, the first goal was to understand where the vast flocks of waders that visit the Wash came from – a task that would provide great insights into the way that the whole East Atlantic Flyway works. In this time, over 300,000 birds have been caught and ringed on the Wash, as you can see in the table below. Equally importantly, hundreds of bird-ringers from across the UK and scores of visitors from around the world have joined WWRG teams, in order to learn more about the study of shorebirds. Further international collaboration has been fostered through overseas visits by WWRG members and emigration of some key personnel. The impact of the Group is truly global, as you can read in the WWRG report for 2014/2015.

wwrg table

A total of 307,226 birds is impressive, especially when some of the species totals are compared to the national totals of the BTO Ringing Scheme for the whole of Britain & Ireland since 1909. WWRG is responsible for over 40% of the Grey Plover, Knot, Sanderling and Bar-tailed Godwit, with Grey Plover topping the list at nearly 60%. These are terrific achievements for a group of volunteers. I don’t have the figures but I reckon that Nigel Clark has been responsible for the largest number of catches.

Wee quiz: What’s the best match between these Wash waders and the countries that they are quite likely to have come from? Answers at the end of the blog:

  • Species: Bar-tailed Godwit, Black-tailed Godwit, Curlew, Oystercatcher, Sanderling, Turnstone
  • Countries: Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Finland & Russia
wwrg box

Firing box connected to 4 cannon-nets

In the early days, rocket nets were borrowed from the Wildfowl Trust for an annual summer week of catches, but the development of cannon-nets gave opportunities for all-year ringing. The intensity of the Group’s activities grew in the 1970s, when there was a threat to build a freshwater reservoir on the mudflats. For a couple of years, Clive Minton (founder and leader) persuaded us to visit fortnightly, so that we could get better data on weight-gain and turn-over, using a mixture of cannon-netting and mist-netting. Everything we knew was published by the Group as The Wash Feasibility Study in 1975. These days, the Group gets together about ten times a year for catching and colour-ring-reading sessions.

wwrg oldies

By catching and ringing large numbers of the key species that visit the Wash, the Group was able to generate maps showing what are now well-known patterns of migration (see Which wader, when and why?). Early on in the Group’s history, there was a focus on nine species, with Black-tailed Godwit added as a tenth when numbers increased. Each of these species has its own section below. The maps were prepared for the Wash Wader Ringing Group 2016/2017 Report by Ryan Burrell, using data stored within the BTO archives. Blue dots represent WWRG-ringed birds that have been found abroad. Red triangles represent foreign-ringed birds caught on the Wash. The base maps used are by courtesy of Natural Earth (www.naturalearthdata.com).

Oystercatcher

wwrg map OCThe map alongside clearly demonstrates the strong link between the Wash and Norway. Other interesting things that have been discovered about Oystercatchers:

  • They live a long time. An Oystercatcher that we caught at Friskney on 30 July 1976 broke the longevity record for a BTO-ringed wader when it was shot in France on 4 April 2017 (41 years 1 month and 5 days). It was ringed as an adult so we don’t know the exact age – but it must have been at least 43 years old. There’s a WaderTales blog with a list of longevity records for BTO-ringed waders.
  • When life gets tough, Oystercatchers fail to complete their autumn moult, retaining some of their outer primaries for an extra year. The ability to complete moult and annual survival rates are both affected by cockle and mussel supplies on the Wash. There’s more about this in two papers in Biological Conservation and the Journal of Applied Ecology.

Grey Plover

wwrg GV GVIn the early days of the WWRG, Grey Plovers occurred in much smaller numbers than they do now. Writing in an article about the first 40 years of the Group, Clive Minton told the story of the first catch of 100, made in 1963, that was celebrated with three bottles of champagne provided by the late Hugh Boyd, delivering on an incentive that he had promised.

  • Over half of the Grey Plover that have been ringed in Britain & Ireland since 1909 have been ringed by WWRG since 1959 (58.9%)
  • All of the Grey Plover using the Wash breed in Siberia. Some birds spend the winter on the Wash but there are autumn moulting flocks of birds that will go on to winter in other parts of Britain & Ireland, and spring and autumn passage of birds that travel as far south as West Africa.
  • Grey Plover are late to leave the Wash, with the last departures not occurring until the start of June. Unsurprisingly, they are some of the last waders to return at the end of summer, which puts pressure on birds to finish moult before the short, cold days of winter. Some adults fail to complete primary moult, especially if food supplies are low. There is more about Grey Plover moult in this WaderTales blog.

wwrg map GV KN

Knot

wash knot

First-winter Knot (subterminal bands on wing coverts and, as yet, unmoulted juvenile fethers on upper-parts)

Knot (or Red Knot) are truly international waders, as is shown in this map of movements of islandica  (and a few canutus) birds  to and from the Wash. Several WWRG members have been heavily involved in efforts to understand the decline in numbers of the rufa subspecies in Delaware Bay (on the North American eastern seaboard) and Clive Minton has been at the heart of efforts to explain the sudden drop in survival of piersmai and rogersi adults that winter in Australia and migrate to Arctic Russia via the Yellow Sea (see Wader declines in the shrinking Yellow Sea).

  • We are still learning about Knot migration. The cluster of reports of WWRG-ringed birds in Northern Norway looks odd on this map projection but it turns out that this is a well-used stopping-off point for islandica Knot heading for northern Greenland and NE Canada. This route was first confirmed in 1985, when a joint Durham University and Tromsø University expedition caught 18 Wash-ringed birds in a total catch of 1703 birds.
  • wwrg net set

    Setting cannon-nets

    Many birdwatchers visit the Wash in autumn and winter to see the swirling Knot flocks at Snettisham and Holme. If high tide is at first light, Knot and other waders sometimes roost on Heacham Beach, giving the occasional opportunity to make a significant catch. The most recent of these, on 11 February in 2012, included 2757 Knot, 77 of which were already wearing rings.

  • The most recent analysis of wader populations in Great Britain showed that there was a drop of nearly 20% in wintering Knot numbers (from 320k to 260k) in less than a decade (see Do population estimates matter?). Regular catches on the Wash will help produce estimates of annual survival rates and age ratios of the islandica subspecies.

Sanderling

wwrg sanderlingThe biggest catches of Sanderling are generally in the summer, when the Wash is a meeting point for birds from Greenland and Siberia. July can sometimes see catches of 200 or more birds. Traditionally, a Sanderling catch was the curtain-raiser at the start of Wash Week, an opportunity for the whole team to make one catch before splitting into ‘Terrington’ and ‘Lincolnshire’ teams for the rest of the main summer trip.

  • Wintering Sanderling on the Wash are thought to be exclusively of the race that heads northwest in the spring, to Greenland via Iceland.
  • Late summer and spring see the addition of birds passing through on their way from/to Siberian and Greenlandic breeding areas.
  • I well remember the first time we caught a Sanderling (on 26 July 1975) wearing an Italian ring (caught in Italy 9 May 1975). Thanks to Jeroen Reneerkens (whose work will be covered in an upcoming blog) I now understand that this is probably a bird that migrates from Namibia to Greenland in spring, via the Mediterranean. It will have been on its way back to Namibia when caught in July.

wwrg map SS DN

Dunlin

wash dunlin

Sam Franks, looking for the buffy tips on inner coverts, which distinguish first-year birds from adults

Nearly half of the waders caught by WWRG have been Dunlin – a total of 140,168 up until the end of 2018. There were really big flocks of Dunlin in the 1970s but numbers have dropped over the years, with peak counts now half what they were, according to WeBS data.

  • We caught over 3,500 Dunlin in one week in 1976 but the annual total has exceeded 1,000 in only four of the last ten years. Partly, this reflects a change in behaviour in the summertime, with fewer waders roosting on fields and hence less catchable.
  • Three races of Dunlin visit the UK. Our winter birds are alpina, from Siberia, NW Russia and northern Scandinavia. A lot of July birds are schinzii, breeding in the UK and as far north as Greenland, and we occasionally try to convince ourselves that we have caught an arctica from northern Greenland.
  • Data collected for the WeBS survey suggest that national winter totals have dropped by over 40% in 25 years. This could perhaps partly be explained by a redistribution of alpina, with new generations of young birds settling in wintering areas on the other side of the North Sea. Warmer winters may well make this a more practical proposition than in the 1970s. There’s more about this in this paper.

Black-tailed Godwit

wash blackwit

Newly ringed Black-tailed Godwit, caught in a mist-net at night.

Black-tailed Godwits became a priority species in 1995, when Jennifer Gill (University of East Anglia) started a project to study the movements of individuals, using colour-rings. Nearly 25 years later, the WWRG-ringed Black-tailed Godwits have contributed data to numerous papers, largely focusing upon migration.

  • The Wash is a hugely important area for moulting islandica Black-tailed Godwits. Some birds stay in East Anglia for the winter but others move south and west within the UK, west to Ireland and south to France, Portugal and Spain.
  • There are several blogs about Black-tailed Godwits in this WaderTales contents list.

Bar-tailed Godwit

One of the key things that was learned from the sudden decline in annual survival rates in a range of species that use the Yellow Sea (as mentioned above) is a need for regular monitoring of marked birds. The WWRG’s Scientific Committee set up colour-flagging projects for Bar-tailed Godwit, Curlew and Grey Plover, in order to increase the reliability of estimates of annual survival for three species that the Group does not catch in sufficient numbers to generate good retrap histories. Birdwatchers can help by reporting colour-marked birds here.

wwrg barwit map etc

  • In Bar-tailed Godwits: Migration & Survival there is a comparison of the data generated by a catch of 505 Bar-tailed Godwits in 1976 with the information that has been generated recently, using colour-flags.
  • Bar-tailed Godwits are long-lived birds. A WWRG bird holds the current record for a BTO-ringed Bar-tailed Godwit: 33 years and 11 months between ringing in 1978 and recapture in 2008. BTO longevity records are discussed in this WaderTales blog.
  • Colour-ring reading is now a significant element of Group activities, as described by Rob Pell in the WWRG Report for 2016/2017.

Curlew

Back in the 1970s, Curlew were still hunted on the Wash (paté made from autumn-shot birds was reported to be very tasty). Shooting stopped in Great Britain in 1981, when the maximum winter count on the Wash had dropped to about 3,000 birds, and by 2003/04 the maximum winter count was 15,336. Since then, numbers have declined, in line with national and international trends.

wwrg curlew map etc

  • A large number of Curlew on the Wash in winter are from Finland and surrounding countries. Surprisingly few are of UK origin.
  • Birds wearing WWRG leg-flags have been observed breeding in the Brecks (Norfolk/Suffolk).
  • The Curlew is internationally designated as ‘Near Threatened’. Is this really true when we can still see a field with 1000 roosting Curlew in Norfolk? Answers here.

Redshank

wash redshThe latest population estimates suggest that Great Britain has lost 26,000 wintering Redshank in less than a decade, representing a drop of 20%. Perhaps WWRG data can be used to help to explain these declines? Here are some of the things we know:

  • The Redshank on The Wash in the winter are mainly a mixture of birds from around the Wash, across the UK and from Iceland.
  • In cold winters, Redshank wintering on the Wash die in large numbers. After a period of severe weather in 1991, nearly 3,000 wader corpses were collected from along the tide-line, about 50% of which were Redshank. The winter WeBS counts for Redshank dropped by 50% after this mortality event but have recovered somewhat since then.
  • An analysis of nearly 1,000 dead Redshank showed that about two-thirds were of Icelandic origin. There was a tendency for smaller birds to be more susceptible to cold weather mortality than larger birds of the same species (More information in this paper by Jacquie Clark)

wwrg map RK TT

Turnstone

wash ttWinter Turnstone are birds that will head for Greenland and NE Canada in the spring but recoveries of birds in Finland and other Scandinavian countries indicate a passage of continental birds. African recoveries of WWRG-ringed birds probably include birds from Canada/Greenland and Finland/Scandinavia.

  • Turnstone wearing US Fish & Wildlife Service rings are occasionally caught on the Wash. Some of these rings were put on by Guy Morrison and his colleagues in Alert, Ellesmere Island, Canada. Guy was an early member of WWRG. It’s a small world!
  • The first Wash Turnstone were colour-ringed in 1999, as part of a study to understand why birds were feeding on the docks at Sutton Bridge. There is a WaderTales blog about the resulting paper by Jen Smart and Jennifer Gill. Colour-ringing continues, to measure annual survival rates.
  • Turnstone have a reputation for eating almost anything (including dog excrement and a human corpse) so do not be surprised if you see a colour-ringed bird scavenging for chips on the Hunstanton sea-front.

A few more highlights

Ringed Plover: this is not one of the ten key study species but 1,432 have been ringed between 1959 and 2018. Some birds are local breeders that hardly move anywhere but other birds link the Wash with Greenland, northern Norway, Morocco and Senegal.

wwrg GKGreenshank: The Group supports a colour-ringing project that was initiated by Pete Potts, in Hampshire. More information here.

Spotted Redshank: During the period 1959 to 2018, WWRG ringed a total of 85 Spotted Redshank, representing over 20% of the total ringed in Britain and Ireland since 1909. Amazingly, sixty of these birds were ringed on the same day – 27 July 1975. There is a blog about this catch and the recent decline in the number of Spotted Redshank visiting the UK. Fewer Spotted Redshanks.

Ruff: Until its closure, WWRG members spent many a smelly night at Wisbech Sewage Farm. This was a great place to catch Ruff, Curlew Sandpipers, Green Sandpipers etc. in mist-nets. Group members wrote a paper about Ruff moult and migration.

Rares: Occasionally there are surprises! WWRG has caught one each of Stone Curlew, Pectoral Sandpiper, Broad-billed Sandpiper and Terek Sandpiper. The last bird features in this WWRG blog.

What do we know now?

Migration studies have revealed the importance of the Wash to half a million or more waders each year – birds that spend the whole winter, others that refuel in the spring and vast numbers that rely on the food supplies in the mud to provide the energy for the post-breeding moult. There’s a selection of papers that have included WWRG data here, on the Group’s web-site.

wwrg cr TTThe Group still aims to maintain its general ringing programme, so that a representative sample of the key species carry rings. Colour-ringing projects aim to provide survival estimates for Curlew, Bar-tailed Godwit, Grey Plover and Turnstone, with Greenshank and Black-tailed Godwit colour-rings contributing to migration studies. Birdwatchers who visit the Wash can help by reporting colour-marked birds here, on the WWRG web-site.

WWRG data have been used to help inform decisions about the future of the Wash but the threats keep coming. Studies of migration and seasonal turn-over in numbers contributed hugely to decisions to provide national and international protection to the area and to fend off the 1970s plan to build a freshwater reservoir on the rich mudflats. The information that has been generated by many generations of volunteers over a period of sixty years has been used to manage the level of shellfish exploitation, to inform decisions about wind turbine locations and to manage activities that can cause disturbance.

The Wash Wader Ringing Group is very keen for its data to be used – and not just for impact assessment studies. Click here to learn more.

Diamond Jubilee

PLI

Phil Ireland releasing a Curlew

Over one thousand people are estimated to have contributed to sixty years of the Wash Wader Ringing Group’s activities. We have lived in barns, rolled cars, dug tens of thousands of holes, carried nets for miles, made important catches, had depressing failures, got frostbite, been threatened by surge tides and made friends for life.

In the whole of this period, there have been only two leaders of the Group – Clive Minton (1959-1981) and Phil Ireland (1981-present). Bird ringers, wader biologists and millions of waders owe them both a huge debt of gratitude.

You can read more about the history of WWRG on the Group’s website:

wwrg sunset

Photo at the top of this blog is by Cathy Ryden. Many thanks to her and to other photographers.

Wee quiz:

  • Bar-tailed Godwit – Russia
  • Black-tailed Godwit – Iceland
  • Curlew – Finland
  • Oystercatcher – Norway
  • Sanderling – Greenland
  • Turnstone – Canada

 


GFA in Iceland

Graham (@grahamfappleton) has studied waders for over 40 years and is currently involved in wader research in the UK and in Iceland.  He was Director of Communications at The British Trust for Ornithology until 2013 and is now a freelance writer and broadcaster.

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Generational change

blog TGG on postIn a changing world, with more chaotic weather patterns and rapidly altering habitats, migratory birds are faced with opportunities and challenges. Long-term monitoring of colour-ringed Black-tailed Godwits, during a period of range expansion and phenological change, has revealed that individuals behave consistently over time but that the behaviour of new generations is moulded by the conditions they encounter.

A changing world 

When trying to explain observed changes in the distributions and annual cycles of migratory birds, there are many things to consider:

  • blog VM y flag

    Colour-rings enable life-time tracking. This bird, caught on its nest, had been ringed as a chick.

    Are individual birds able to take advantage of new breeding and non-breeding sites, as they become available, particularly if other areas become less suitable?

  • Are individuals able to change the timings and patterns of migration?
  • Do individuals adjust their migration routes as a consequence of changes in stop-over or wintering areas?
  • If individuals do not change what they do, how do we explain range expansions and changes in timing of migration?

Put simply, how does climate change lead to changes in distribution of migratory birds? Answering this question is key to being able to predict the rate and direction of future changes, and to assess whether our existing networks of protected sites will continue to support populations in the way that was intended. This issue was tackled by Jennifer Gill, José Alves and Tómas Gunnarsson in their paper “Mechanisms driving phenological and range change in migratory species”, published in Linking behaviour to dynamics of population and communities: applications of novel approaches in behavioural ecology and conservation, a special issue of Philosophical Transactions B (Royal Society).

Potential models

Change could happen in two main ways:

  • Individuals could relocate – having knowledge of a range of available conditions, they can choose to move elsewhere.
  • New generations could settle in new areas (in the breeding season, the non-breeding season or both) and/or adopt new migratory strategies.
blog map

Map that illustrates range expansion

Working out whether change happens through individual movement or generational shifts can only be done by life-long tracking of individuals, in populations in which range change is happening. The Icelandic population of Black-tailed Godwit is ideal for such an investigation. Black-tailed Godwits have been expanding into new breeding areas of Iceland for over 100 years, as discussed in this WaderTales blog. Population growth has been facilitated through warming spring conditions, as discussed in From local warming to range expansion.

blog TGG juvs

Naive youngsters, gathering together before migration

Icelandic Black-tailed Godwits fly south in the autumn, to spend the winter in the British Isles, The Netherlands, Belgium, France, Spain and Portugal. As numbers have grown, winter counts have increased in many areas, with new flocks appearing and expanding on estuaries and areas of wet grassland where the species was previously absent or scarce.

 

Winter distribution

The Wetland Bird Survey shows that there are three times as many Black-tailed Godwits wintering in Great Britain as there were 25 years ago. The biggest changes in numbers have occurred on estuaries in the northwest of England, with the Morecambe Bay winter maximum rising from about 180 to 3200, for instance. Where have these extra birds come from?

blog juvs on Axe

These young birds happen to have ended up on the Axe Estuary in Somerset

Black-tailed Godwits have been ringed in Iceland for nearly twenty years, providing a pool of known-age adults for which natal sites are known. Winter observations of colour-ringed individuals have shown an interesting pattern; birds breeding in newly-colonised areas, particularly in north and east Iceland, are the ones that are more likely to be found in newer winter sites.

In their paper, the authors suggest that birds nesting in these colder areas, where spring comes later, will be fledging quite late and leaving Iceland after adults have departed. With no experienced birds to follow, these young birds may well stop off at the first suitable site, many of which are in the north of the wintering range, and then they return to breed in their natal sites. Birds in Morecambe Bay don’t know that days are longer and the weather is kinder for other birds that travel further south to wintering areas such as Portugal.

blog RS Dee

Wintering birds in Northwest England

Observations from birdwatchers show that the same colour-ringed individuals are nearly always found at the same wintering sites each year. Whatever mechanism is producing this new-breeding-site to new-wintering-site link, it is becoming clear that older birds continue to do what they have always done, with changes in distribution happening as a result of a generational shift.

The annual cycle

Colour-ringed Black-tailed Godwits have been tracked for over 25 years, with a small number of individuals contributing data for the whole of this period. This tracking information can be used to ask how much individuals move around and experience different sites and to assess whether individuals from different generations are using different parts of the range.

Using colour-rings, the Black-tailed Godwit team has discovered that, although individuals can live for over 20 years, in that time they generally use a total of only about four sites between leaving Iceland in late summer and returning in the spring. Basically, individual birds have very limited experience of sites and there is no evidence that they have moved to occupy different sites as, for instance, winter conditions have changed.

blog infographic

Spring arrivals in Iceland

Colour-ring observations have shown that individual birds do not change their breeding or wintering locations and that migrating individuals often appear in the same stop-over sites year after year. The timing of movements is also pretty consistent, especially in the spring. A previous WaderTales blog called Why is spring migration getting earlier? demonstrated that the timing of  migration of individual Black-tailed Godwits varies very little, with observed shifts in the period of migration being driven by young birds returning to Iceland for the first time on average doing so somewhat earlier than previous generations. Once individual birds settle into a timing pattern, they stick to it.

blog LJ arrivals

Black-tailed Godwits, newly arrived in Iceland after crossing the Atlantic

Migration patterns

As discussed above, individual Icelandic Black-tailed Godwits have experience of only a small number of sites, which they use on an annual cycle. When migrating, a bird will generally use the same stop-over site when breaking its journey south, to undertake autumn moult, or on their way north, to take on fat for the trans-Atlantic journey. There is a range of spring migratory strategies in islandica Black-tailed Godwits, as discussed in Overtaking on migration.

blog wwrwOnce established, the annual migratory programmes of individuals rarely change, as illustrated by the map to the right. Colour-ringed Black-tailed Godwit W-WR/W regularly moulted on the Wash, in eastern England, before spending the late winter and spring in northwest England. In the late summer of 2002 he was reported at Slimbridge on 18th and 20th July but back on the Wash on the 25th. Having made the Atlantic crossing and ended up in southwest England, he was able to correct what he may have perceived to be his mistake, returning to the moulting area that he had been using since at least 1996.

Individuals might not change their annual migration routes but we do see changes in numbers on different sites that are used during migratory stop-overs. In a paper published in 2018, Mo Verhoeven and colleagues investigated whether observed changes in migratory patterns of a population of the limosa subspecies of Black-tailed Godwit were caused by individuals altering their strategies or by generational change.

Limosa Black-tailed Godwits leave breeding areas in countries such as The Netherlands in late summer, heading south to either West Africa or Iberia, where they spend the winter. In spring they all gather in staging sites in Portugal and Spain, typically on rice fields. Over the course of less than ten years, the average peak number in Extremadura (Spain) has dropped from about 24,000 to 10,000, while the numbers on the Tagus and Sado estuaries rose from 44,000 to 51,000. These changes took place during a period of rapid population decline, as described in this blog focusing on a paper by Rosemarie Kentie and colleagues.

blog VM Tagus

Limosa Black-tailed Godwits feeding in a rice field in the Tagus estuary

Mo Verhoeven et al have shown that this rapid population-level shift in spring stop-over sites from Spain to Portugal, 300 km further west, was driven by young godwits increasingly using Portugal in the period January to March, instead of Spain. Nearly all of the older birds stuck with the routes they knew. The paper is Generational shift in spring staging site use by a long-distance migratory bird.

Change happens to birds

One thing that is becoming clear in Black-tailed Godwits is that birds are being affected by change – individuals do not have the knowledge or flexibility to effect change. Even in long-lived birds, like Black-tailed Godwits, we see no evidence of individuals altering what they do over what is now two decades, despite the fact that the species’ migration dates, wintering areas and migration routes have all perceptibly changed over the same time period. It’s all about generational change. The behaviour patterns of young birds arise from the conditions they encounter in the first year of life, after which they are repeated.

Details of the Generational Change paper by Gill et al

blog LJ sum plumThe paper at the heart of this blog is: Mechanisms driving phenological and range change in migratory species by Jennifer Gill, José Alves and Tómas Gunnarsson, from the Universities of East Anglia (UK), Aveiro (Portugal) and Iceland. It is published in Linking behaviour to dynamics of population and communities: applications of novel approaches in behavioural ecology and conservation, a special issue of Philosophical Transactions B (Royal Society).

The paper could not have been produced without the help of “thousands of observers of colour-ringed godwits who have made these analyses possible”. This WaderTales blog is a celebration of the work they do: Godwits and Godwiteers.


GFA in Iceland

WaderTales blogs are written by Graham Appleton, to celebrate waders and wader research.  Many of the articles are based on previously published papers, with the aim of making wader science available to a broader audience.

@grahamfappleton

 

Time to nest again?

blog Snipe TGGEarly return to breeding areas is widely acknowledged to be ‘a good thing’ but why? Some people suggest that early migrants can choose the best territories, others argue that early chicks have a disproportionately high chance of fledging but there are other explanations too. In their paper in Ecology & Evolution, Catriona Morrison and her colleagues ask how much of the advantage of being an early migrant could be associated with having an option to nest again, if the first attempt fails.

Setting the scene

In a previous WaderTales blog, about Icelandic Black-tailed Godwits, there is clear evidence that the species is increasing in number and spreading into new breeding areas. In another blog you can read that the expansion is linked to warmer spring conditions, which allow earlier nesting. How might this change in nesting phenology influence overall productivity and contribute to the population growth in Black-tailed Godwits, and do the same processes work for other species?

blog oyc godwit

Individual Black-tailed Godwits that arrive in Iceland early each year may have a higher chance of nesting successfully, just because they have time to try again if the first nest fails

In their 2019 paper, Catriona Morrison and her colleagues from the Universities of East Anglia (UK), Iceland and Aveiro (Portugal) used a simulation model to ask whether the greater time available for laying replacement clutches can create a pattern of increased productivity among early-arriving migrants, without the need to think about territory choice or local resource availability. They suggest that early arrival can lead to greater breeding success simply because early birds have more time available to nest again, following nest loss. Within the model they explore the effect on breeding success of varying several important relationships:

  • blog Snipe nest

    This early Snipe nest might get predated but there should be time to try again

    Whether early clutches are more likely to hatch than later ones (seasonal variation in nest survival rates) – such a trend could be created by predation patterns, resource availability and opportunities to conceal nests.

  • Whether one or more replacement clutches is possible within the time available during the breeding season (number of re-nesting attempts).
  • Whether late chicks are less likely to survive and become breeding adults than earlier ones (seasonal variation in recruitment rates) – which would make re-nesting attempts less valuable.

Results

The models developed for the paper showed that, when the chance of losing a breeding attempt does not change during the course of the breeding season, species experiencing intermediate nest survival rates will benefit most from re-nesting. This makes sense; a species that has a very high chance of hatching its chicks will not need to re-nest and one that has a negligible success rate is not going to do much better if it lays more than one clutch.

blog Lapwing

This late-nesting Lapwing may not be able to defend its nest

Nest success may not be constant over the course of a season. Late pairs may find it harder to distract predators if they don’t have the support of other breeding birds, with a consequent drop in success over the summer. Alternatively, species that nests in clumps of grass, such as Snipe, might find it easier to hide their nests later in the season, thereby increasing nesting success over time.

Picking out just a few of the scenarios that are covered in more detail in the paper:

  • When nest survival rates are constant and replacement clutches are possible, early arrival increases the probability of achieving a successful nesting attempt. These benefits of early arrival can be substantial enough to persist even when late-hatched chicks (from replacement nests) are less likely to survive and recruit into adulthood.
  • If there is a seasonal decline in nest survival, late-arriving individuals will have far fewer successful nesting attempts in their lifetime than early-arrivers. In this case, laying replacement clutches only slightly increases the number of successful nesting attempts and the subsequent number of recruits.
  • If there is a seasonal increase in nest survival, early-arriving individuals will tend to lose their first clutches but these individuals have time to re-nest, and are likely to fledge the subsequent attempt. Late-arriving individuals arriving will be more likely to have a successful first attempt and hence the number of successful nesting attempts varies little with arrival date.

The main take-home message of the paper is that, in almost all of the circumstances considered, early arrival can lead to higher breeding success, simply because of the greater time available to lay replacement clutches.

Blog RP migration

What does this mean for waders?

blog Oyc nest

An Oystercatcher does not need much time to ‘build’ a nest

Repeat nesting is a common strategy in waders; a female Oystercatcher, for instance, can quite quickly lay a second clutch if the first clutch is lost. Strategies exist that can lead to a female having more than one successful brood in a season, as seen when a female Dotterel leaves a male to incubate a clutch of eggs and moves on to another male. In most circumstances, however, a pair of waders has time to raise one brood of chicks in a season, by succeeding with the first attempt or taking opportunities to lay replacement clutches if time and resources allow.

It is obvious that, if nesting success is very high, there will be little need to lay a second clutch and if success is really low, little will be achieved by laying more clutches. Waders tend to have intermediate nest-success; most are ground-nesters, making them vulnerable to a wide range of mammalian and avian predators of eggs and chicks. The scenarios modelled in the paper are particularly (but not exclusively) appropriate to breeding waders

blog Knot

Knot – a High Arctic breeder, constrained by a short season

The modelling used in this paper shows that having the time to try again is likely to increase the probability of annual success, as long as the breeding season is long enough. We know that pairs of Ringed Plovers breeding at temperate latitudes have time for several breeding attempts but pairs at high latitudes may have little chance for a second attempt, especially if nest failure occurs late in the incubation period. One way of increasing the time available to breed is to arrive earlier and the benefits of early arrival may be particularly strong for birds that occupy areas where there is a lengthening potential breeding season, something that can be made possible through climate change and warmer springs.

It is not uncommon for a breeding wader to live for five years, ten years – or even longer for larger species (WaderTales blog). During its lifetime, an individual may experience breeding seasons with differing levels of predator activity or other causes of nest loss, such as flooding or trampling, might occur. Although an individual might migrate at the same time each spring, the number of nesting attempts it will be able to fit in during any particular year will depend upon factors such as weather, prey availability and predation pressure.

blog Sanderling

Sanderling with chicks

Nest survival rates in wader populations can show seasonal declines (e.g. Sandercock 1999 – Semipalmated Sandpipers), increases (e.g. Reneerekens et al. 2016 – Sanderling) or little seasonal variation in survival (e.g. Sandercock 1999 – Western Sandpiper), but in all cases there is variability between years. All of these seasonal patterns of survival change were modelled in the Morrison et al paper. In almost every situation, a wader will have a higher chance of successfully rearing youngsters if it (and its mate) are on an early spring migration schedule.

Summary

blog Oyc

This Oystercatcher may regret nesting early! If it fails, it can try again.

Turning up early on breeding grounds in spring can potentially lead to higher reproductive success, solely as a result of the greater time available for laying a replacement clutch. Using modelling, Catriona Morrison and colleagues show that this early-arrival-benefit can be conferred even when later nesting attempts are less likely to produce successful recruits.

Advances in the timing of spring migration are occurring in many species and these findings highlight the potential role of replacement nests as a driver of population increase in those areas where repeat nesting becomes increasingly possible. Professional ornithologists and citizen scientists who study nesting birds (not just waders) are encouraged to do so for the whole season, especially by following marked individuals. Birds that wear geolocators, which can record incubation patterns for nesting attempts that would otherwise remain undetected, may be particularly helpful when trying to discover just how likely birds are to re-nest and with what success.

Only part of the story

Blog tag

Geolocator on Whimbrel

In the long run, the success of an individual bird can be measured by the number of offspring it has in its lifetime and even by the number of its genes that are present in future generations. The number of chicks that fledge each year is only part of the story, therefore. How many of these youngsters recruit to the breeding population? Do they end up breeding in areas where they will have high breeding success? Will their progeny live for a long time and hence have many opportunities to produce their own chicks? Long-term wader studies might reveal some of these answers – eventually.

Paper

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The aim: a successful brood

The paper was published in Ecology & Evolution.

Why do earlier-arriving migratory birds have better breeding success? Catriona A. Morrison, José A. Alves, Tómas G. Gunnarsson, Böðvar Þórisson and Jennifer A. Gill.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.5441

The paper is freely available to view.

 


GFA in Iceland

Graham (@grahamfappleton) has studied waders for over 40 years and is currently involved in wader research in the UK and in Iceland.  He was Director of Communications at The British Trust for Ornithology until 2013 and is now a freelance writer and broadcaster.

Whimbrel: time to leave

blog WW-WLGeolocators* have provided fantastic information about the movements of migratory birds – making links between countries, revealing previously unknown stop-over sites and indicating just how quickly birds traverse our planet. A small number of Icelandic Whimbrel have carried geolocators for up to six annual cycles, providing Camilo Carneiro with an opportunity to investigate the annual consistency of egg-laying, autumn departure, arrival in West Africa, departure in the spring, stopover in Western Europe and arrival back in Iceland.

* Geolocators are tiny devices that record the daily positions of birds, by measuring the timing of dawn and dusk. An individual typically carries a geolocator for a year and then needs to be re-caught for the data to be downloaded.

Planning a trip

When booking a train journey on-line, the first question I am asked is whether I want to stipulate departure time or arrival time.  In early spring, with breeding on their minds, you might think that Whimbrel will focus on the time they need to be in Iceland, rather than the time they leave West Africa? If that’s the case then it might be best to take early spring opportunities if they arise, to catch express winds that will make the journey as rapid as possible and to get to Iceland early. Is that the case?

blog mangroves and beach

The Whimbrel is one of several wader species that breed in Iceland. Each autumn, Redshank, Snipe, Golden Plover, Oystercatcher and Black-tailed Godwit fly south to Europe, especially Ireland and the United Kingdom, but many Ringed Plover, most Dunlin and most Whimbrel travel as far as Africa. The main wintering sites for Whimbrel are in West Africa, south of the Sahara, in countries such as Guinea-Bissau. Here they can be seen feeding on crabs on the mangrove-fringed muddy shoreline (above). It’s a very different environment to the inland floodplains of Iceland (below).

blog river plain

In a paper by Tómas Gunnarsson & Gunnar Tómasson in 2011, we learnt that Whimbrel arrival times in Iceland did not change much between 1988 and 2009 (just 0.16 days earlier per year), while timing of arrival was advancing much more in species that travel less far to winter grounds, as you can see in this diagram.

wader arrival Tand G

Changes in first spring arrival dates of six species of waders in southern Iceland from 1988 to 2009 (reproduced from Gunnarsson & Tómasson 2011).

The arrival date for Black-tailed Godwit was advancing fastest (0.81 days per year). In more recent research, it has been shown that the rapidly advancing trend for Black-tailed Godwits is being driven by new recruits to the population – individual adults are not changing their schedules. Why is spring migration getting earlier? summarises a paper by Gill et al in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

The Whimbrel trend has been recalculated, with a longer run of years, and the new change of 0.03 days earlier per year is not significantly different from zero. Given that Whimbrel are breeding alongside other species that are arriving in Iceland much earlier than thirty years ago, what are the constraints to the timing of their migrations?

Migration timings for Whimbrel

Camilo Carneiro, José Alves and Tómas Gunnarsson from the Universities of Aveiro (Portugal) and Iceland have been studying a population of Whimbrel in Southern Iceland. Birds are caught on the nest in one year and then re-caught in the subsequent year – or two years later if a bird evades capture in the intervening summer. The following results summarise weeks and weeks of patient fieldwork and brush over the hours of frustration caused by wary birds that have been caught before!

blog catching

Over the course of the whole study, 86 Whimbrel were fitted with geolocators, 62 of which were retrieved. Repeatability could be calculated for 16 birds, with between 2 and 7 years of data collected from each individual. The results are summarised in these few bullet points. Please see the paper for confidence intervals and more details about differences between the sexes.

  • Blog tagIndividual timings of autumn departure from Iceland varied between years. The repeatability index is 0.28, with a suggestion of a gender difference (females 0.40, males 0.02). Males tend to look after chicks for a longer period than females so their departure dates may be more strongly influenced by the success of each year’s breeding attempt.
  • Autumn arrival time in West Africa was closely linked to departure time because, on all but one occasion, southward migration was achieved through a single direct flight. See Iceland to Africa non-stop.
  • Spring departure time from West Africa was highly consistent, with a repeatability index of 0.76 and no discernible difference in repeatability between males and females.
  • blog long green grassSpring arrivals in Iceland. Some Whimbrel that managed to complete spring migration in a single flight in some years stopped off in other years. These breaks, perhaps to wait for more helpful wind conditions and/or to refuel, resulted in variability in annual arrival dates for individuals. The repeatability for the two sexes combined was 0.23.
  • Laying date was the least consistent stage of the annual cycle, with a repeatability index of 0.11 and no significant difference between males and females.

In an individual Whimbrel’s annual cycle, there appears to be one fixed point – departure from wintering ground in West Africa. With no discernible seasonality of resource availability on the wintering grounds and little change in day length in these areas, departure dates are probably being determined by an ‘internal clock’. Two major unknowns will then determine what happens in the next twelve months. Will wind and weather conditions be conducive to a one-leg flight to Iceland and how successful will a bird be in any particular breeding season? Unforeseen events, such as having to wait for a delayed partner, losing a first clutch, and the time needed to guard chicks will all affect the timing of autumn migration.

Understanding individuals

blog tag through grassThe study of wader migration has advanced hugely.

  • Fifty years ago, the main measure of migration phenology was the appearance of the first individuals of a species.
  • Colour-ring sightings are ideal for providing repeat arrival dates over the lifetimes of individuals, as exemplified by the Gill et al paper on Black-tailed Godwits, which suggest that individual timing is highly repeatable.
  • Geolocators have provided more detailed information about the precise arrival and departure timings of individuals, which is so important if we wish to conserve threatened, migratory species that visit areas in which data collection was previously virtually impossible.
  • Now, by tracking individual birds for several years, it is possible to look at the variability in annual patterns, and what can cause this variability.

Over the next decade or so, as devices get smaller and remote downloads become easier (eg using GSM tags), it should become possible to understand the conditions that lead to fast, slow and aborted migratory journeys in a whole range of species. Exciting times!

Paper

Why are Whimbrels not advancing their arrival dates into Iceland? Exploring seasonal and sex-specific variation in consistency of individual timing during the annual cycle. Camilo Carneiro, Tómas G Gunnarsson & José A Alves. Frontiers in Ecology & Evolution.

There is more about the information that is obtained from geolocators, how they work and the affects that they have on the individual birds that wear them in these two blogs:

blog roost flock


GFA in Iceland

WaderTales blogs are written by Graham Appleton, to celebrate waders and wader research.  Many of the articles are based on previously published papers, with the aim of making wader science available to a broader audience.

@grahamfappleton

 

 

 

January to June 2019

blog CU postOne or two WaderTales blogs are published each month. The series is UK-based with a global reach. Suggestions of newly-published research on waders that might be of interest to birdwatchers who appreciate waders/shorebirds are welcomed. I am particularly keen to give feedback to colour-ring readers; they provide a huge amount of information that lies at the heart of these stories.

Click on a link in bold to read an individual blog.

You can sign up to receive an e-mail notification when a new blog is published.


GFA in IcelandGraham (@grahamfappleton) has studied waders for over 40 years and is currently involved in wader research in the UK and in Iceland.  He was Director of Communications at The British Trust for Ornithology until 2013 and is now a freelance writer and broadcaster.

Managing water for waders

blog L sittingYour task, should you choose to accept it, is to turn farmland into a haven for breeding waders. The only tools you have at your disposal are tractors and cows and we will give you permission to pump water out of nearby rivers when conditions allow. That’s how it started. These days the diggers look big enough to use on a motorway construction site!

If your aim is to maximise the number of pairs of breeding waders on your lowland wet grassland farm or nature reserve, then one of the key issues is to get the water levels right. The first  part of this blog focuses on providing an appropriate mix of ditches, pools and grazed grassland for species such as Lapwing, Redshank and Snipe and then keeping everything wet enough (but not too wet) during the important chick-rearing season.

The second part of the blog is not just about maximising the number of breeding waders on a nature reserve. It’s also about working with neighbouring farmers, in order to secure fresh water supplies for the future and to reduce the risk of salt-water inundations, associated with sea level rise. In the long-term, stakeholder engagement has proved far more important than habitat management, as you will read below.

Understanding water levels

When developing lowland wet grasslands for waders, an extra five cm of late-winter rain can make a huge difference, especially if you can capture as much as possible of the rain that falls or can draw water from a swollen river. Mark Smart, the Senior Site Manager for the RSPB’s Berney Marshes and Breydon Water reserve in East Anglia, understands grazing marshes and how to capture and distribute water, in order to provide the muddy edges where wader chicks find insects. An aerial photograph of Berney Marsh shows how Mark has designed a special landscape to capture winter rain – one that is ideal for Lapwings and other waders.

Mark has taken the lessons he has learnt on RSPB nature reserves and shared them widely, a contribution to conservation that earned him one of the 2018 Marsh Awards for Wetland Conservation from the Wildfowl & Wetland Trust.

From wheat and barley to ducks and waders

blog cow eatingThe marshes of the Norfolk Broads have been drying out for 2000 years. By the 1970s, and after over 400 years of farming, the Halvergate Marsh complex was on the point of being fully drained and by 1985 much of the wet grassland in which waders formerly bred had already been lost and turned into arable fields. At this point, the RSPB made its first purchase of land, as they tried to retain at least some of the threatened habitat which is so important to winter wildfowl and summer waders. At the same time, campaigning by local and national conservationists secured legal protection for the unique Broadland scenery and the species that rely upon the habitats it contains, thereby halting the advance of the combine harvesters.

The importance of Halvergate Marshes for wildlife has long been known, and in 1987 it became the site of the UKs first Environmentally Sensitive Area – the prototype for subsequent agri-environment schemes. Lowland wet grasslands are traditionally drained using ‘footdrains’ – narrow, shallow channels that connect low-lying parts of the fields with surrounding ditches, in order to drain them.

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The muddy edges of a footdrain

These same footdrains can be used to hold and manage surface water levels within fields, by blocking the ditch connections with sluices. In the 1990s, Mark pioneered the design and deployment of footdrains on lowland wet grasslands, and the kit needed for their construction. Through his skills, enthusiasm and collaborations with grassland managers throughout lowland England, footdrains and the water that they can contain are now a common sight. Many generations of wader families have enjoyed the invertebrate food that footdrains support.

The breeding season for waders is very short – with the first Lapwing claiming territories in March and most chicks fledged by the end of July. Outside these months, these wet grasslands provide excellent grazing for geese and ducks in the winter and cattle in the summer. The task of nature reserve managers is to work with graziers to try to ensure that cattle deliver appropriate sward heights for winter wildfowl and summer waders.

Not just water

fence 2By creating a hot-spot for nesting birds, within an intensively-farmed landscape, land-managers also produce a food-rich area for predators, attracted in by concentrations of eggs, chicks and sitting adults. Restricting the activities of species such as foxes and crows is an important part of the role of an RSPB warden, carried out through site management and active control measures. By focusing these activities in the winter period, the RSPB’s Halvergate Marshes team are able to stop corvids and foxes from setting up territories within the area that is managed for breeding waders. Electric fencing can help to prevent foxes moving onto the site in spring, while changing the way that core wader areas are managed helps to reduce fox/nest interactions by, for instance:

  • Adding shallow ditches in the right places can break up the site into compartments and reduce the likelihood that nests will be predated.
  • Leaving areas with long grass, that is good for small mammals and the mustelids and foxes that prey upon them, can change the focus of hunting activities.
  • Erecting temporary fencing, during at least the early part of the nesting season, can both provide protection and potentially increase the synchronicity of nesting attempts and hence the ability of birds effectively to mob predators.

blog L chickThere is more about these measures in these blogs, with links to papers from the RSPB and University of East Anglia team of conservation researchers:

There is annual management of the Berney site too, with foot-drains to be re-cut, spoil to be spread in ways that can provide a mix of water-levels and more muddy edges, and rotovation of some areas to increase the diversity of habitats. These techniques might seem rather different to the ones that are used by farmers but many of the other operations at Berney are the same as would be seen outside nature reserves, with fences to mend, stock to manage and creeping thistle and rush to ‘weed-wipe’.

blog rotovation

Rotovation, carried out in dry conditions, adds heterogeneity and creates bare, muddy areas

Measuring success

The development of Berney Marshes has been hugely successful. Back in 1987, there were only 13 pairs of wader breeding on the site – nine pairs of Redshank and four of Lapwing. The total for 2019 looks like being about 270 pairs – over twenty times as many.

blog RK graphRedshank: The graph alongside illustrates how Redshank numbers have changed across the decades. At the same time as Breeding Bird Survey (BTO, JNCC & RSPB) for England results revealed huge declines, with a loss of nearly half in the period 1995-2017, Redshank pairs on Berney Marshes have been increasing. Even on this site, there is a suggestion that the peak number of pairs may be in the past. Given the pressures on breeding Redshank on saltmarsh habitats (blog: Redshank – the ‘warden of the marshes’), providing breeding habitat in coastal marshes, inside sea-walls, may be particularly important. Hopefully, the latest earthworks (see later) will create more space for Redshank.

Left image below shows Redshank nest in a clump of grass. The right image shows a Lapwing nest in a newly-rotovated patch. 

 

blog L graphLapwing: Between 1988 and 1998, the number of pairs of Lapwing rose from 14 to 79, reaching a peak of 157 in 2010. Numbers vary, according to spring weather and water levels, with between 83 and 130 pairs in the years 2011 to 2019. The national decline in England was 28% between 1995 and 2017 (Breeding Bird Survey) – not quite as drastic as for Redshank but still worrying. Intensive studies at Berney have shown that productivity is only high enough to boost numbers in some years. The latest project by UEA and RSPB conservation scientists involves trialling temporary electric fences to provide protection for first clutches and broods. Hopefully Berney can become a net exporter of Lapwings in most years.

Oystercatcher: There were no Oystercatchers breeding at Berney back in 1997. The peak number of pairs was 18 in 2009, with an average of ten pairs in subsequent years. Nationally, numbers in England have increased but with major declines in Scotland, which is the species’ heartland within the UK. This is discussed in an earlier WaderTales blog.

Avocet: The RSPB’s logo species has been hugely successful, nationally, with the help of protection and habitat creation. The first pair of Avocets bred at Berney in 1992 and pairs have bred in most years since then, with over thirty pairs in nine years but no pairs in 2013 or 2014. The 2019 count is 35 pairs and there is potential for further growth in numbers across the site, with the creation of more island homes (see below).

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Combined harvesters have been replaced by nesting Avocets

Snipe: Despite all of the excellent habitat creation work, there have never been more than 8 pairs of Snipe recorded on Berney and only between 0 and 3 pairs in each of the last ten years. The underlying soils at Berney are clay-based, which may not suit this species.

Sharing the knowledge

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Redshank chick: science is an important feature of the work at Berney

Although it’s great that the RSPB has been able to buy and develop land for breeding waders in the Yare Valley, the impact of their work has been far larger, thanks to management agreements with other landowners. Mark Smart and the RSPB have set up Broads Land Management Services, to deliver wet grasslands that attract the top tier of conservation payments for farmers working in the Broads. Much of the recent work has been part of the Water Mills and Marshes Project, funded by HLF and led by the Broads Authority. Using specialist ditch-cutting and spoil-spreading equipment, the team has been able to create wet features within top-quality grazing fields. This is not just a local initiative; the kit and the advice have had impacts on farms and nature reserves across the country.

For his work for wetland conservation, Mark Smart received a Marsh Award for Wetland Conservation from the Wildfowl & Wetland Trust in 2018. “Mark Smart received his award for his 17 years managing RSPB Berney Marshes in the Norfolk Broads. Over this period, he brought together landowners, conservationists, local authorities and scientists to improve the marshes for wildlife. Today more than 300 pairs of wading birds nest there each spring, and more than 100,000 waterbirds return to it each winter.”

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Illustrations above shows work that has been completed at Somerleyton in Suffolk and a newly-fledged Lapwing.

blog DutchWorking with his wife, Jen Smart, who is a Principal Conservation Scientist at the RSPB’s centre for Conservation, Mark has added a Dutch dimension to the RSPB’s advice work by co-authoring Meadowbirds on the horizon of southwest Friesland.  This report has just been published by the International Wader Study Group.

Climate – ‘the new normal’

Fresh water is an increasingly important commodity in East Anglia – for farmers and for nature reserve wardens, looking to maximise agricultural and wader chick production. More extreme weather patterns are already producing periods of drought and intense periods of rain, while a rising sea-level is increasing the salinity of rivers and limiting extraction opportunities. Broadland farmers are looking for a reliable water supply, the Environment Agency is looking for ways to reinforce sea defences and for places to store fresh water, in order to avoid flooding, and the RSPB wants to hold more water in the late winter that can be used to keep areas wet in the early summer. With some lateral thinking, many of the needs of these key stakeholders can be met in partnership projects, as shown below

The Environment Agency’s need for material to raise sea defences provided Mark Smart with an opportunity to provide more pools and scrapes for breeding waders. It was a win-win solution; free habitat creation work for the RSPB and minimal movement of the clay and top-soil that the Environment Agency needed. In the images below, you can see this work in progress and the islands that are now being used by nesting Avocets.

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The most recent project is an ambitious water storage and flood reduction scheme for the whole of Halvergate Marsh. This will keep salt water out of these important grazing marshes and store fresh water for summer use. The £2 million Halvergate Marshes Water Level Management Improvement Scheme is a joint initiative, funded by DEFRA and delivered by the Water Management Alliance. The project involves a large number of stakeholders, including the Broads Internal Drainage Board, RSPB and neighbouring farming estates.

blog 8 km

The Water Level Management Improvement Scheme is a huge undertaking, with 8 km of new ditches, 240 piped culverts and 12 big sluices, that will create storage for 60,000 cubic metres of fresh water and systems to distribute this water over the course of a dry East Anglian summer. One of the most impressive features of the project, illustrating the imagination of the design team, is the Higher Level Carrier, a ‘flyover’ ditch system that passes over the top of existing wet grazing land to get water to some of the driest part of Halvergate Marshes (left picture below). This high-level water transportation route was constructed using locally-sourced clay, thereby creating shallow pools around which yet more waders are already nesting.

blog overpass

When designing this project, the opportunity was taken to develop opportunities for birdwatchers to see the birds that will be drawn into the wettest areas, by making sure that the ‘best bits’ are close to public access points on the Weavers’ Way, the 61 mile (100 km) long-distance path running from Cromer to Great Yarmouth.

Aspirations

Mark Smart has not finished yet! Plans are afoot to develop the RSPB’s land that is closest to Great Yarmouth, recently purchased using a WREN grant. If agreed, this can provide an alternative, safe high-tide refuge area for tens of thousands of waders and wildfowl that roost on the mud and saltmarsh at the mouth of the Yare. Their current high-tide refuge is threatened by sea-level rise and developments proposed for the outskirts of Great Yarmouth.

blog aspirations

This proposed roosting area will be part of an extension to the Halvergate Marshes Water Level Management Improvement Scheme, which will add another 10,000 cubic metres of water storage. Alongside flood alleviation and fresh-water conservation, this scheme will create fifty hectares of additional shallow wader and waterfowl scrapes adjacent to Breydon Water.

blog Wood spThe new scrapes should not only attract wintering and breeding birds but also many passage waders, such as the Wood Sandpiper pictured to the right. The whole scheme has the potential to be another win-win-win-win, for the owners of low-lying properties, for Broadland farmers, for internationally important bird populations and for local and visiting birdwatchers.

Read more

Information about the RSPB’s Berney Marshes & Breydon Water reserve can be found on the RSPB’s website. Click here

There is information about the Water, Mills and Marshes project here.

blog AV


GFA in Iceland

WaderTales blogs are written by Graham Appleton, to celebrate waders and wader research.  Many of the articles are based on previously published papers, with the aim of making wader science available to a broader audience.

@grahamfappleton

 

Chicks and ticks

How do ticks affect Golden Plover chicks? pic chick on moveBy utilising data from an existing study, David Douglas and James Pearce-Higgins have discovered that Golden Plover chicks that carry more sheep-ticks Ixodes ricinus have a lower chance of survival. Their findings are written up as a paper in Bird Study. The work is only based on a small sample and the data don’t identify the mechanism that leads to increased mortality but, given the current interest in the biological effects of ticks, the findings are interesting.

Costs of carrying ticks

Carrying ticks has three potential effects on wader chicks

  • Ticks suck blood, which could be costly.
  • Ticks can introduce diseases, via tick-borne bacteria and viruses.
  • There may be effects on feeding efficiency, via impaired vision, hearing etc.

Sheep ticks act as vectors for a variety of pathogens, including the louping ill virus (LIV) which can affect a range of domestic and wild mammals, as well as wild birds. LIV is known to cause high mortality of Red Grouse chicks but there has been no previous assessment of the effects of sheep ticks on other moorland birds, such as breeding waders. It should be noted that wader chicks eat ticks – so they are not ‘all bad’.

pic ticks

Ticks can clearly be seen on the unfeathered lower eyelid of this young chick. There are smaller ticks attached to the gape at the base of the beak as well.

All sorts of things could influence the probability of tick infestation in birds:

  • Ticks may be able to survive better in warmer conditions.
  • Tick numbers can be affected by the number of mammalian hosts.
  • Mammal to bird transfer could be affected by land management and habitat structure.

Ecological interactions between ectoparasitic ticks and waders are not well understood. Given possible increases in tick abundance with climate change, the authors of the new study felt that it would be useful to test whether ticks have detectable effects on the Golden Plover chicks that carry them.

Spotting an opportunity

The Golden Plover chicks that provided the data used in this paper were caught as part of a wind farm study at Gordonbush in northern Scotland, a site made up of 33 km2 of blanket bog. There is more information about the study in these two papers:

pic habitat

Gordonbush, prior to the development of a wind farm

Tick numbers on Golden Plover chicks were collected at the time of ringing (within 24 hours of hatching) and during subsequent recaptures. Recapture was facilitated by locating tagged birds using radio-location. On each capture, chicks were weighed and the number of ticks visible on the bare parts of the head (around the eyes and bill) were counted. Most ticks attach themselves to the bare parts of the head and neck.

Variation in tick loads on Golden Plover chicks

pic nesting ad

Incubating adult. Golden Plovers commence primary moult at the start of (or before) incubation. Read more here.

The number of sheep-ticks found on these Golden Plover chicks was higher than those previously reported for waders but were within the range of those found on Red Grouse on moorland. Previous wader studies had been focused upon areas with sheep, which were routinely treated to reduce tick infestations. In the current study it was found that:

  • 90% of chicks were carrying ticks, with between 1 and 12 ticks being found on each affected Golden Plover chick. The highest tick-load was found in mid-age chicks.
  • Tick loads were higher during periods with warmer maximum temperatures and when chicks were estimated to have moved through taller vegetation between recaptures.
  • Chick growth rates were depressed by high tick-loads, especially when temperatures were warmer.
  • Of the 21 chicks, 4 fledged, 13 died and the outcomes for the other 4 were unknown. Half of the deaths appeared to have been due to predation and half to starvation/exposure.
  • Chicks that were heavier (for their ages) were more likely to survive. Those with higher tick loads (for their ages) were less likely to survive.

With the small sample size, it was not possible to detect a correlation between tick load and chick growth rates but low survival was correlated with high tick-loads. This had not previously been documented for waders.

Implications for wader conservation

pic red deerGordonbush is an area where there is no grazing by domestic animals so the likely mammalian tick-hosts are Red Deer in particular and also Mountain Hare. The correlation between warmer weather and tick numbers, found in this study, could be explained by increased tick activity, while the link to taller vegetation may well be explained by ticks seeking damper microhabitats. In their discussion of the results, the authors suggest potential ways that ticks and waders, of different ages, might interact. Anyone looking to expand the work, in order to understand the mechanics of tick infestation, is likely to spend more time looking at ticks than waders!

pic Curlew

Could ticks be reducing survival probabilities for  young Curlew?

The authors of this paper were not able to test for the presence of disease (such as LIV) in their Golden Plover population but this is a plausible cause of the increased probability of mortality. In a study in Yorkshire by Newborn et al. (2009), no evidence was found of LIV in wader chicks, whereas it was present in 3.6% of a sample of Red Grouse chicks at the same sites. Newborn and colleagues report that a single Eurasian Curlew chick has previously been recorded to be seropositive for LIV. In the Newborn study, the lowest incidence of ticks among waders was in Lapwings (6% of broods), followed by Golden Plover (47% of broods had ticks) and Curlew (91% of broods). There is a hint, in these data, that ticks might more commonly attach themselves to wader chicks that are found in taller vegetation.

Despite high tick loads on chicks, and the correlation with lower chick survival, the overall percentage of Golden Plover chicks known to fledge in the Gordonbush study (19%) is comparable with other studies. Perhaps ticks are only causing the deaths of chicks that would have died anyway?

pic Red GrouseThe authors suggest that no case should be made for tick-control, to help breeding waders, until it is clear whether tick-based chick mortality limits Golden Plover and other wader populations on moorland. In the paper, they argue that previous attempts to reduce moorland tick abundance and tick loads on Red Grouse have failed to detect convincing evidence of improvements in grouse survival, breeding success or post-breeding densities.

A range of methods have been deployed in attempts to reduce moorland tick abundance and tick loads on Red Grouse, including reducing densities of mammalian tick hosts (Mountain Hare and deer) and deploying acaricides (as used in sheep dips). See this link to material from GWCT on ticks and Red Grouse.

In conclusion

pic older chickWork at a single site over two years appears to have documented a level of tick infestation in Golden Plovers that is associated with chick mortality. It is not clear how chicks are being affected, particularly given that there is insufficient evidence thus far that ticks affect chick growth rate.

The authors collected the data analysed in this paper for other studies – the focus was not on tick effects – and they hope that funding might be found for future research focusing upon the associations between ticks and waders, other birds and other animals. Until that happens, it would be useful if shorebird biologists who repeatedly handle wader chicks, in order to measure growth and survival rates, could routinely record the presence or absence of ticks.

Given that warming temperatures could lead to increased tick abundance, this seems to be a good time to discover more about tick behaviour, the importance of ticks as a food source for wader chicks and whether tick-loads are reducing growth rates and fledging success in other wader species.

Paper

This research is published in the BTO journal Bird Study. Click on the details below to link to the full paper:

Variation in ectoparasitic sheep tick Ixodes ricinus infestation on European Golden Plover chicks Pluvialis apricaria and implications for growth and survival. David J. T. Douglas and James W. Pearce-Higgins. Bird Study. June 2019.

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GFA in Iceland

WaderTales blogs are written by Graham Appleton, to celebrate waders and wader research.  Many of the articles are based on previously published papers, with the aim of making wader science available to a broader audience.

@grahamfappleton

Redshank – the ‘warden of the marshes’

blog nesting RKAre subsidies that are designed to protect the biodiversity of Britain’s saltmarshes, delivering the planned, conservation benefits? In particular, is this investment supporting populations of amber-listed Redshank?

About 25,000 pairs of Redshank are thought to breed in the United Kingdom (link to APEP), with about half of these nesting in coastal saltmarshes. In recognition of the importance of saltmarshes, agricultural grants are available to support their management, with a focus on providing an appropriate level of grazing for a range of plants, birds and insects. In their 2019 paper in the Journal of Applied Ecology, Lucy Mason and her RSPB colleagues ask some serious questions – are these agricultural subsidies being well spent?

Saltmarsh grazing is an important conservation prescription that is used to try to boost, or at least maintain, populations of breeding waders, particularly Redshank, as well as to conserve the unique herb-rich habitats in which they hide their nests and raise their young. This study follows on from an earlier paper that showed that more than 50% of saltmarsh-nesting Redshank in Great Britain were lost between 1985 and 2011, and three papers by Elwyn Sharps on the impacts of cattle that graze saltmarshes during the Redshank breeding season (about which there is more below).

Why worry about Redshank?

The latest population estimate for Redshank in the United Kingdom is 25,000 pairs, as many as 50% of which are birds nesting on saltings. Redshank is an amber-listed species of conservation concern in the UK, with the most recent population changes showing a drop of 44% between 1995 and 2017 (Breeding Bird Survey) and a larger decline over the period since 1990.

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What are saltmarshes?

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Rich plant communities

Saltmarshes are intricate, dynamic habitats, where land meets sea. They are highly productive ecosystems, rich in plants, birds and insects. Traditionally, they would have been grazed by herbivorous mammals and waterfowl but, in the absence of free-roaming animals, the only way to maintain the short but diverse swards favoured by specialist plants and animals is to employ the services of cattle and sheep. Although saltmarsh still covers large areas, it is estimated that over 50% has been lost or degraded globally, thanks to reclamation and erosion. Further losses are occurring, as saltmarshes get squeezed between rising sea levels and the hard sea defences that protect coastal settlements and farmland.

The structure of saltmarsh is created by the way that water moves, as waves dissipate their energy and deposit silt during higher, spring and storm tides and the water then runs back off the salting. The latter process creates branching creeks that drain the marsh, from small meandering ditches, that are just big enough to catch a foot and twist an ankle, to waist-deep, fast-flowing channels with slippery, muddy sides.

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Deep creeks of outer marsh

Anyone who has been out on a marsh will know that, with some local knowledge, it is possible to make your way from the sea-wall to the edge of the saltmarsh along a route that lies between two creek systems. On the other hand, travelling along the muddy, salting edge parallel to the sea-wall is difficult, as it involves crossing creeks. Grazing animals face the same navigation problems; it’s a lot easier to graze wide expanses of the upper marsh than the outer areas that are dissected by deep creeks. As discussed below, these upper areas, with a mixture of short grass and clumps of longer grass, are also the ones that are favoured by breeding Redshank.

How many Redshank breed on saltmarshes?

A 2013 paper by Lucy Malpas (now Lucy Mason) in Bird Study brought together evidence of declines in saltmarsh-breeding Redshank over a 26-year period. An estimated total of 21,431 pairs were found to be breeding on British saltmarsh in 1985 but this had dropped to 11,946 pairs in 2011, with the highest proportion of the remaining population found in East Anglia. The 2011 survey showed that there were regional variations (see table), with the biggest declines in Scotland. Looking at the way that saltmarshes were managed, Lucy found that Redshank declines were less severe on conservation-managed sites in East Anglia and the South of England, where grazing pressures remained low, but more severe on conservation-managed sites in the North West, where heavy grazing persisted.

tableAt the end of this Bird Study paper, Lucy and her colleagues suggest that saltmarsh-breeding Redshank declines are likely to be driven by a lack of suitable nesting habitat. Conservation management schemes and site protection, implemented since 1996, appeared not to be delivering the grazing regimes and associated habitat conditions required by this species, particularly in the northwest of England. Although habitat changes may not be linked to unsuitable grazing management in all regions, they suggested the need for a better understanding of grazing practices and consideration of potential long-term management solutions.

Grazing levels and Redshank numbers

Intensive grazing leads to a very short uniform sward, lighter grazing produces a more uneven patchy sward with diverse heights, whilst no grazing can leave saltmarshes with dense communities of coarse grasses. For Redshank, that need clumps of grass in which to hide their nests and more open areas in which chicks can feed, light grazing is a key management tool.  Elwyn Sharps and colleagues, working on the salt marshes of the Ribble Estuary in northwest England, were interested to see how grazing regimes worked for the local Redshanks. Elwyn showed that the risk of Redshank nest predation increased from 28% with no breeding-season grazing to 95% with grazing of 0.5 cattle per hectare per year, which is still within the definition of light grazing.

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In follow-up work, Elwyn showed that livestock play an important role in creating the clumps of Festuca rubra habitat preferred by Redshank nesting on the Ribble Estuary but that even low-intensity conservation grazing can create a shorter than ideal sward height, potentially leaving Redshank nests more vulnerable to predators. There is more about this in the WaderTales blog: Big Foot and the Redshank Nest.

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Grazing the higher saltmarsh

One of the missing elements from Elwyn’s first two papers about grazing levels was an understanding of the behaviour of cattle on saltmarsh. In the next piece of work, Elwyn and colleagues tracked the movements of individual cattle, using GPS collars, and assessed the vulnerability of nesting Redshank, using dummy nests. In a 2017 paper in Ecology & Evolution, they showed that cattle spend their time in the same areas of saltmarsh as the ones in which Redshanks like to nest. Their conclusion is that “grazing management should aim to keep livestock away from Redshank nesting habitat between mid-April and mid-July, when nests are active, through delaying the onset of grazing or introducing a rotational grazing system”.

Do conservation payments deliver?

To assess whether conservation grazing is being achieved, and whether agri-environment schemes are effective in delivering this management, Lucy Mason and her colleagues conducted a national survey of English saltmarshes, scoring the management on each site as optimal, suboptimal or detrimental, based on five aspects of grazing (presence, stock type, intensity, timing and habitat impact). They surveyed 213 saltmarsh sites in three regions during 2013, representing 50% of the vegetated saltmarsh in England. Of the study sites, 114 (54%) received payments for saltmarsh management and/or conservation grazing options through Higher Level Stewardship, or the Countryside Stewardship Scheme. The annual cost of saltmarsh and grazing management options in the marshes that were studied was £543,075 for 10,218 ha of saltmarsh, equating to over £5 million spent on saltmarsh management options over the course of 10 years.

blog muddy creekTo assess grazing levels, the team visited each site up to four times during the core grazing period (April–October), to count cattle. They also assessed the longer-term impact of grazing on saltmarsh habitat, by measuring sward height and heterogeneity. Combining the measurements of site condition and analysing the results produced the following key findings:

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    Nest hidden in clump of grass

    Although most saltmarsh sites in England that are capable of supporting grazing are grazed by livestock, conservation grazing is not being achieved.

  • Nationally, the biggest management failings relate to the timing of grazing and the way that grazing impacts upon habitat structure.
  • There were regional differences in scores relating to stock type, grazing intensity, grazing timing and habitat impacts, but no single region scored higher than others overall.
  • Sites with Agri-Environment Scheme (AES) agreements were no more likely to be grazed than sites without AES – some subsidies were being paid without any active grazing taking place.
  • AES reduced grazing pressure but not sufficiently to achieve optimal conservation grazing requirements, indicating that AES has been an ineffective conservation mechanism on saltmarsh.
  • In the East, older AES sites scored substantially higher and approached optimal levels, suggesting that managers and advisers can improve outcomes by working together over longer periods.

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Improving the system

The authors argue that, although there is sound scientific evidence as to how saltmarshes should be managed, to provide positive conservation outcomes, there are problems when it comes to the translation of evidence into recommendations for hands-on management. It is also difficult to encourage land managers to implement recommendations when these go against traditional farming practices and economic gain. To improve the situation, Lucy and her colleagues suggest that:

  • When establishing agreements, it is helpful to provide detailed prescriptions that can guide land-managers.
  • AES payments need to take account of the costs of grazing a complex environment, which means thinking about the availability of cattle of appropriate ages at the right times of year, provision of fresh water and high-tide refuges, and the use of fences to divide up the saltmarsh, in order to provide a rotational grazing system.
  • Prescriptions that focus on numbers of cattle and timing of grazing are easier to follow than ones that focus on intensity and habitat condition.
  • Additionally, a more detailed and reliable system of auditing would be beneficial, to ensure that management activities take place to the necessary standard prior to payments.
  • Moving to a results-based scheme, where payments are made based on desirable outcomes, rather than on evidence of management, may improve the overall conservation value and economic efficiency of saltmarsh AES options.

Blog JoshIn conclusion

Raising cattle on saltmarsh is hard work, in terms of stock control, but requires no fertiliser inputs.  These ‘mobile mowing units’ stop saltings from becoming long and rank, thereby creating spaces in which a rich plant and grass community can flourish, where geese and waterfowl can graze during the winter months, and potentially providing nesting spaces for breeding waders, such as the amber-listed Redshank, breeding numbers of which are still declining.

Lucy and her RSPB colleagues conclude that Agri-environment Schemes are the only mechanisms through which saltmarsh conservation grazing can be implemented on a national scale, so it’s important to make sure that they are as effective as possible. By working together, it is hoped that policymakers, researchers and managers can refine conservation guidelines which are used to create management schemes that attract subsidies. They suggest that better value could be achieved through more sensitive use of current management activities or perhaps by linking payments to conservation outcomes, rather than on evidence of management.

blog cr RKThe noisy warning calls of a pair Redshank, as they encourage their chicks to hide, have earned the species the title ‘warden of the marshes’. Their calls also appear to be a warning cry about the state of Britain’s saltmarshes, despite the large amount of money being provided through agricultural subsidies and the good intentions of conservation organisations, agricultural advisers and graziers.

You can read more here:

Are agri-environment schemes successful in delivering conservation grazing management on saltmarsh? Lucy R. Mason, Alastair Feather, Nick Godden, Chris C. Vreugdenhil & Jennifer Smart. Journal of  Applied Ecology. May 2019.

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GFA in Iceland

WaderTales blogs are written by Graham Appleton, to celebrate waders and wader research.  Many of the articles are based on previously published papers, with the aim of making wader science available to a broader audience.

@grahamfappleton

Not-so-Common Sandpipers

April and May mark the start of the Common Sandpiper breeding season, as males display along rivers and streams and around the banks of lakes and reservoirs. Numbers in the United Kingdom have declined by 26% in just over 20 years, providing an increased focus to research that has been taking place over five decades.

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This tale focuses on a year in the life of Common Sandpipers, using material gleaned from the book Common & Spotted Sandpipers by Phil Holland (published by Whittles in 2018) but with new information from recent migration studies. Phil’s fascinating book also includes chapters about the habitats used by both species, the food that they eat, predators that eat them and the way that Common Sandpipers have adapted (or failed to adapt) to changes in Britain over the last 250 years.

Common or Spotted?

blog spottyThis blog is just about Common Sandpipers. The Spotted Sandpiper breaks up the circumpolar distribution of the Common Sandpiper, laying claim to the Americas. A big difference between the two species is the mating system, with Common Sandpiper pairs setting up territories in a conventional (although not particularly faithful) manner and Spotted Sandpipers using polyandry in a way that provides females with the potential to raise more chicks in a year.

A female Spotted Sandpiper sets up a territory, attracts a male, lays a clutch of eggs which her partner then incubates, attracts and lays another clutch for another male, and so on. In Phil Holland’s book, there is an example of one female laying five clutches with three males over the course of six weeks – representing an egg-mass of four times her own body weight. There is plenty more fascinating stuff about Spotted Sandpipers in the book.

Population changes

The Breeding Bird Survey indicates a fall in breeding Common Sandpiper numbers in the UK of 26% between 1995 and 2017, with a bigger decline in England (49%) than in Scotland (23%). Other BTO-led surveys suggest that the nationwide declines started in the mid-1980s, with a British fall of over 50% during this longer period. There have been similar declines elsewhere in Europe. Common Sandpiper is now amber-listed, as a species of conservation concern, in the UK.

Breeding season

Much of the detailed breeding season work on Common Sandpiper in the UK was undertaken in the English Peak District by Phil Holland and then Derek Yalden, to whom Phil Holland’s book is dedicated, with information supplemented by other bird ringers, particularly Tom Dougall in Scotland.

blog nestMale Common Sandpipers tend to arrive back from Africa a little earlier than females – with a median difference of just two days – and it is the male that holds the territory (females in Spotted Sandpiper). If two birds that were together in the previous year arrive back on site then they will usually pair up again. When they don’t, it’s because of a mismatch in the timing of arrival or because the female moves to a better territory or more experienced mate. It may not be easy to spot infidelity in the field but genetic analysis in Scotland showed that males were incubating the eggs that had not been fertilized by them in 5 out of 26 cases (Mee paper link). On two of these occasions, none of the clutch of four belonged to the male that was sitting on them.

blog sittingDuring the incubation period, males typically take the 15-hour night-shift and females the 9-hour day-shift. During their ‘time off’, males devote time to territory defence and look-out duties. Chicks hatch after three weeks and the growth rate of chicks is highest in warm, dry and sunny weather. Males do most of the parenting of chicks; females usually leave before the chicks fledge and occasionally, if there are late nests, before the eggs hatch. Experienced parents raise more chicks to the point of fledging. There is more fascinating detail in the book, which includes full references for papers.

The southward migration

blog mapMovements of ringed birds from Scotland and Northern England strongly suggested that adults left their breeding territories and headed south within the UK, to fatten up prior to migration to Africa. British ringers have caught birds weighing up to 80 g, twice the pre-fattening weight, suggesting the potential to move a long way in the next flight.

Geolocators have been a revelation, enabling individuals to be tracked for the whole annual cycle between one breeding season and the next. The story of the first UK Common Sandpiper to return with a functioning geolocator was told in Wader Study by Brian Bates and colleagues, revealing two stops in western Britain, a three-day break in Morocco and a direct flight to Senegal.

There’s a WaderTales blog about the use of geolocators on Green Sandpipers that gives more information about how data are collected and discusses how these devices affect the behaviour of the birds that carry them.

A follow-up paper by the same Scottish team from Highland Ringing Group, this time with Ron Summers as lead author, has been published in the Journal of Avian Biology (Non-breeding areas and timing of migration in relation to weather of Scottish-breeding common sandpipers). It summarises the journeys of 10 tagged birds, with a median departure date from Scotland of 9 July. Some individuals spent time fattening in England, then most birds staged for longer in Iberia before continuing to West Africa, with a median arrival time of 28 July. The southward migration from Scotland took an average 17.5 days (range 1.5–24 days), excluding the initial fuelling period.

Pere Josa and colleagues have studied Common Sandpipers in The Ebro Delta of Spain, writing up their findings in Wader Study as Autumn migration of the Common Sandpiper. These stop-over adults migrate seven weeks earlier than juveniles, putting on enough fat to travel at least 2000 km on the next stage of their journeys, which would take them to North Africa. They would need to refuel if they were to make it as far as West Africa, which is the main wintering area for Common Sandpipers. Common & Spotted Sandpipers provides many more examples of ringing and body condition studies carried out in stop-over sites between Sweden and Morocco.

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Life in the south

blog mangroveSix of the tagged birds from Scotland spent most of the non-breeding season (October–February) on the coast of Guinea-Bissau, suggesting that this is a key area. Single birds occurred in Sierra Leone, Guinea, the Canary Islands and Western Sahara.

Coastal West Africa provides two major habitats for Common Sandpipers: mudflats associated with mangroves (as shown to the right) and rice fields. Phil Holland takes the reader around the mangroves of the world and discusses the numbers of Common and Spotted Sandpipers that have been reported from different countries. He suggests that rice fields provide supplementary food for birds that are mainly coastal winterers and wonders if the depletion of mangrove habitat  has affected Common Sandpipers.

The northward migration

The last day in West Africa, for the 10 tagged individuals, ranged from 3 to 20 April and the arrival dates in Scotland ranged from 19 April to 6 May. The birds typically staged twice between Morocco and the Channel and the median time taken for active migration was 16 days (range 13.5–20.5 days). The main migration strategy involved short- and medium-range flights, using tail-winds in most cases. Birds that left later spent shorter periods of time at stop-over locations.

Why so few Common Sandpipers?

survival blogAs discussed in the WaderTales blog summarising Patterns and processes in shorebird survival rates: a global review by Verónica Méndez in IBIS, the apparent annual survival rate of the Actitis family is low, with a calculated rate of 0.718 for Common Sandpiper and 0.497 for Spotted Sandpiper. Whether this has always been the case is unknown, of course, and Phil Holland points out that these calculations are based upon observations of colour-ringed individuals, at least some of which change territories between years, potentially leading to a reduction in detectability.

An analysis of demographic data for a small population of Common Sandpipers in northern England, by James Pearce-Higgins and colleagues indicated that the long-term decline in numbers was not due to low breeding success, instead being due to a low return rate of adults, which was negatively associated with the winter North Atlantic Oscillation. This suggested that climate change might be affecting annual survival.

In their paper about the 10 Scottish birds, tracked using geolocators, Ron Summers and colleagues matched movements to meteorological data during the migration period. They suggest that the weather during the southward migration was unlikely to adversely affect birds but that strong cross-winds or head-winds during the northward migration to the breeding grounds may do so. This accords with work on Black-tailed Godwits by Nathan Senner and colleagues which showed that the survival of satellite-tagged birds was reduced on the northward crossing from West Africa to Europe.

For the moment, there is no clear explanation for the fall in Common Sandpiper numbers. Given that it’s hard to change the climate or to study what might be happening to Common Sandpipers feeding amongst the mangroves of West Africa, it seems wise to focus on habitat and species protection in breeding areas. We also need to keep monitoring productivity and return rates of breeding populations in the UK and elsewhere, especially in the English Peak District.

Common & Spotted Sandpipers

blog coverPhil Holland’s book is a fascinating insight into the lives of the two Actitis species. It’s almost as if the reader is allowed to sit on a bank with the author and share intimate moments with these birds. Derek Yalden would have been delighted to see the project come to fruition but acknowledge that there is still much to learn. Who will spend the next 40 years studying Common Sandpipers in Europe and Africa or Asia and Australasia, or Spotted Sandpiper in the Americas?

Book Details

Common & Spotted Sandpipers is published by Whittles Books. You can find out more by following this link.

New research

blog CKThomas Mondain-Monval (Lancaster University) is trying to understand the UK-decline of Common Sandpipers.  He is studying a breeding population in the Yorkshire Dales National Park, tracking birds on migration and studying them at a wintering site in Djoudj National Bird Sanctuary, Senegal.  Birds are fitted with colour rings and geolocators in the UK and Senegal, and Thomas would appreciate reports of migrating birds, which are likely to appear in Iberia, France and England. If licensed bird-ringers see birds with geolocators and spot opportunities to catch them and remove the trackers, this would be very helpful. Thomas can be contacted at:

t.mondain-monval@lancaster.ac.uk


GFA in Iceland

WaderTales blogs are written by Graham Appleton, to celebrate waders and wader research.  Many of the articles are based on previously published papers, with the aim of making wader science available to a broader audience.

@grahamfappleton

Ireland’s wintering waders

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There’s still space for a few Knot

The island of Ireland is a great refuge for wintering waders, washed as it is by the warm waters of the Gulf Stream. It’s just a quick hop across the Atlantic from Iceland for Black-tailed Godwits, Golden Plovers, Redshanks and Oystercatchers. For birds travelling from Siberia, such as Bar-tailed Godwits and Grey Plovers, it’s a longer journey but one that’s well worth making.

If Ireland is such a great destination for shorebirds, why do the latest population estimates reveal a decline of nearly 20% in wader numbers in just five years?

This blog summarises the wader information, published in Estimates of waterbird numbers wintering in Ireland, 2011/12 – 2015/16 in Irish Birds. The totals in the report are split into counts for the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland but, given that waders don’t recognise borders, most of the comments in this blog relate to the whole of Ireland. The results for 2011-16 have been compared to the equivalent figures for 2006-11 and set in the context of the totals of wintering waders throughout the East Atlantic flyway, as combined by Wetlands International. The Irish data were collected by the amazing volunteers who make monthly, winter counts for I-WeBS (BirdWatch Ireland & National Parks & Wildlife Service) and WeBS (BTO/RSPB/JNCC in Northern Ireland).

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Headline figures

Fifteen species are considered in this report. The most numerous are Lapwing and Golden Plover, which account for an estimate over 170,000 individuals between them, whilst the smallest contributions are made by Purple Sandpiper (662) and Greenshank (1317). In total, the average estimated number of waders in the winters during the period 2011-16 is 429,170 birds but it should be noted that this total excludes two widespread and common species – Woodcock and Snipe – as well as the enigmatic Jack Snipe. To update previous estimates for these three species, which were last made using distribution and abundance data collected during Bird Atlas 2007-11 fieldwork, it would be necessary to run a special inland survey. There is also some question about Lapwing and Golden Plover numbers, simply because so many of these birds are found in areas that are not covered by monthly waterbird counts.

Biggest changes

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The Irish Sanderling population has increased by 13.2% in five years

The combined average winter maximum count of the 15 wader species examined in the report declined by 102,310 birds (19%) in the five-year period between 2006-11 and 2011-16. This is extremely worrying. If Lapwing and Golden Plover are excluded from consideration, as there is uncertainty about the completeness of counts, there are five species that are of particular concern; Knot numbers dropped by more than 40% and Oystercatcher, Dunlin, Redshank and Turnstone numbers by more than 20%. The Purple Sandpiper population estimate dropped by over 30% but relatively small numbers of this species are encountered around the rocky coast of Ireland. The only species to show increases were Sanderling, Bar-tailed Godwit, Black-tailed Godwit and Greenshank.

In a previous WaderTales blog, there is detailed information about population estimates for Great Britain: Do population estimates matter? In Great Britain there were similar rates of decline for Redshank and Turnstone (measured over an eight-year, rather than five-year period) but much smaller falls for Knot, Oystercatcher and Dunlin. The possible causes of the changes in Ireland are discussed in the paper in Irish Birds. They include flyway-scale declines (e.g. Knot and Curlew) and the possibility that more birds from the east are now wintering on the coasts of mainland Europe (e.g. Dunlin and Grey Plover).

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European context

Blog tableThe table alongside gives an indication of the relative importance of Ireland, Great Britain and, together, the British Isles to the birds that use the East Atlantic flyway during the winter period. The three columns show the percentage of each species found in each of the three regions. Summarised international counts, as used in the paper, were kindly provided by Wetlands International. In the case of four species, Ireland is host to a significant proportion of the Icelandic breeding population (Oystercatcher, Golden Plover, Black-tailed Godwit and Redshank).

Notes: As mentioned earlier, there are questions about the precision of estimates for Lapwing and Golden Plover, although the population trends are reliable. The Ringed Plover percentage seems high (98% for British Isles) but this may well reflect the fact that the Non-estuarine Waterbird Survey has uncovered significant numbers of the species on the open shores of Great Britain. These extra birds are included in the new totals for GB but not in the flyway total. The percentages for Black-tailed Godwit seem low, as discussed further down.

Ireland is particularly important for Golden Plover, Ringed Plover, Bar-tailed Godwit and Black-tailed Godwit, as well as for the Icelandic subspecies of Redshank. Greenshank is excluded because the percentages are below 1% of the flyway population for Ireland and for Great Britain.

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11% of Bar-tailed Godwit on the East Atlantic Flyway spend the winter in Ireland

Although there are important populations of breeding waders in Ireland, the shores and wet fields of the island really come into their own during July and August, when the first ‘winter’ waders arrive, and they only become quiet again in April and May, when the last birds head north and east to nest. A successful breeder is likely only to be away for four or five months, meaning that these waders will spend by far the largest part of the year in Ireland. The island is even more important for immature birds. Young Oystercatchers that arrive from Iceland, Scotland or perhaps Norway when just a few months old are likely to spend the next 30 months in Ireland before making their first trip north. There is a WaderTales migration blog about the Oystercatchers that fly from Iceland: Migratory decisions for Icelandic Oystercatchers.

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Curlew in the Republic

Curlew numbers in the Republic of Ireland illustrate the relative importance of the country for breeding and non-breeding populations. The winter population estimate for Curlew in the Republic is 28,300 but the most recent survey conducted by BirdWatch Ireland and NPWS, as summarised in the WaderTales blog Ireland’s Curlew Crisis, reveals that the number of breeding birds has crashed to just 138 pairs. Accounting for young Irish birds that have not started to breed, and even if we assume that all Irish birds stay in the country for the winter, then the total number of home-grown Curlew seen in non-breeding flocks is at most about 400. This means that every winter flock of 70 Curlew will contain an average of just one Irish bird. Far more deliver their curl-ew calls with a Scottish, Finnish or Swedish ‘accent’. The map below shows the migration pattern for Curlew ringed in or found in Britain & Ireland.

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Black-tailed Godwit

In the table above, it looks as if 18% of Iceland’s Black-tailed Godwits spend the winter in Ireland. This is probably an underestimate of the importance of the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland to the species. The flyway total for Black-tailed Godwit is given as between 98,000 and 134,000 in the Irish Birds paper and the percentage figure is based on 110,000. These three figures are almost certainly too high, as they build upon country-based estimates that have subsequently been revised. The true figure is likely to be around 60,000 to 65,000 (J. Gill pers. comm.), which would suggest that the maximum winter count in Ireland of 19,800 represents at least 30% of the islandica Black-tailed Godwits. Add in extra birds that moult in Ireland in the autumn, before moving further south to countries such as Portugal, and other birds that spend spring months on the island, and Ireland becomes even more important for Black-tailed Godwits!

blog BTMost birdwatchers might associate flocks of waders with estuaries but Black-tailed Godwit is an excellent example of a species that also relies on inland fields, either close to estuaries or along river valleys. Whilst undertaking PhD research on Black-tailed Godwits in south-east Ireland, Daniel Hayhow showed that there is insufficient time to find enough estuarine food during the mid-winter tidal cycles, with birds topping up their resources on grassland. You can read more about the energetic consequences of choosing to winter in eastern England, Portugal and Ireland in this blog: Overtaking on migration. Site designation and planning decisions need to take account of the grassland feeding requirements of Black-tailed Godwits and other waders that do not spend all of their time on estuaries, particularly Curlew.

Conservation implications

Some of the issues facing waders may be related to threats that species face in the breeding grounds. However, it may be easier to introduce measures that provide better protection and feeding opportunities in the wintering area, as ways of maintaining populations through the non-breeding season, than it is to deal with problems in the High Arctic. (Although we can all help by reducing carbon emissions, in order to minimise global warming, of course).

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Reading the report, I was reminded of the need to consider a range of conservation issues:

  • Care needs to be taken when considering shoreline developments. These can directly remove habitat or squeeze the width of the intertidal zone.
  • Increased harvesting of shellfish can affect species such as Oystercatcher and Knot and brings risks of introducing alien species and diseases.
  • In the drive to cut carbon emissions, tidal, wave and wind power developments need to be sited in appropriate places.
  • Off-shore harvesting of growing kelp beds has been suggested, as a way of producing fertiliser and biofuels. This process could reduce protection for beaches and change the availability of resources for species such as Turnstone and Sanderling.
  • Grassland areas need to be considered (and not just estuaries) when planning protection for species such as Curlew and Black-tailed Godwit.

blog RKPaper

Estimates of waterbird numbers wintering in Ireland, 2011/12 – 2015/16. Brian Burke, Lesley J. Lewis, Niamh Fitzgerald, Teresa Frost, Graham Austin, and T. David Tierney. Irish Birds No. 41, 1-12.

There is a complementary paper in British Birds, covering Great Britain. The wader information is summarised in this blog: Do population estimates matter?


GFA in Iceland

WaderTales blogs are written by Graham Appleton, to celebrate waders and wader research.  Many of the articles are based on previously published papers, with the aim of making wader science available to a broader audience.

@grahamfappleton