Disturbed Turnstones

blog facingIn a 2020 paper, Mark Whittingham and colleagues show that, in one area of northeast England, the decline in Turnstone numbers is more obvious on mainland sites that are subject to human disturbance than on offshore refuges. Whilst national declines are probably linked to factors affecting productivity in breeding areas in Greenland and Canada, it is interesting that Turnstone seem to be withdrawing into areas where they are subject to less winter disturbance.

Turnstones – some background

The Turnstones that we see around the coastline of Britain and Ireland in the winter are almost exclusively birds that fly here from Greenland and eastern Canada, as you can read in this blog about wader migration (Which wader, when and why?). Britain’s wintering Turnstone numbers are falling, as are populations of several other species, such as Curlew, Oystercatcher, Knot and Redshank (see Do population estimates matter?). Turnstones are opportunist feeders; although traditionally thought of as rocky coast specialists, they can also be found on muddy estuaries and around beach-bars in the Caribbean (Why do Turnstones eat chips?).

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Measuring disturbance

Assessing the effects of disturbance during the winter is not easy. Feeding waders may be flushed by bait-diggers, kayakers, dog-walkers etc. but is this an issue if the food that they were attempting to eat becomes available later? To demonstrate that disturbance is a real problem, one would ideally demonstrate reductions in fitness measures such as survival, recruitment and/or productivity. This is discussed in a paper by Jenny Gill and colleagues, who studied the potential effects of disturbance on feeding Black-tailed Godwits (paper in Journal of Applied Ecology) and in another paper by Colin Beale and Pat Monaghan that shows that well-fed Turnstones were quicker to respond to disturbance than birds that had not received supplementary food supplies (Animal Behaviour).  Birds may be quicker to fly if they are well-fed or there is somewhere else where they can feed. The ones that have no choice and are still hungry may be the last to leave. The issue is discussed more widely in Why behavioural responses may not reflect the population consequences of human disturbance.

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It’s not just waders : Little Egret being chased  along the shores of the River Bann SPA and (below) the last few Brent Geese being removed from saltmarsh on the Exe Estuary (SPA)

Potentially, roosting waders could be more prone to disturbance than feeding birds, because of the wasted energy associated with flying around over the high-tide period or relocating to an alternative roost site (see A place to roost). An interesting modelling paper by Mark Rehfisch and colleagues showed that 90% of Dunlin, Grey Plover and Redshank on the Wash could be serviced by roost sites that were 2 km, 2.5 km and 3.5 km apart, respectively (Applied Ecology). These numbers may or may not be comparable for Turnstone but do suggest that small- to medium-sized waders feed within relatively short distances of their preferred roosting areas.

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Turnstone in this study

Turnstone is a species of qualifying interest for the Northumbria Coast Special Protection Area (SPA) and for several Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) in the region. On this 140 km stretch of coast, the population of Turnstone declined by 27% between 2004/5 and 2009/10, during a period when the wintering number within England declined by 9%. There was concern that human disturbance may be one of the drivers of the population decline of wintering Turmstone within the SPA. Potentially such conditions could become more challenging towards the end of the winter, when food supplies may be less and birds are preparing for migration, or during periods of very cold weather. Given an increase in the local human (and canine) population and a marked rise in tourism within the region, it was suggested that the potential for disturbance may have increased.

 

study area

The aim of the study was to compare wintering Turnstone densities and changes in counts across time from sites with differing levels of human disturbance. This was possible because long-term Wetland Bird Survey counts of waders had been made in the period between 1998/99 and 2015/16. Counts were available for two offshore refuges and 17 mainland sites that were subject to higher levels of human disturbance. No direct measure of human disturbance was available so questionnaires were used to determine the behaviour of beach users, in terms of distance travelled to visit the coast. The paper contains full detail of this methodology.

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Results

After controlling for the extent of preferred habitat (rocky shore) at each site the authors found that:

  1. The closer each of the 19 sites was to the nearest offshore refuge the higher the density of Turnstones, where density is calculated as birds per hectare of suitable feeding habitat.
  2. Turnstone counts at the four sites closest to, or containing, offshore refuges showed no significant declines. Despite the national decline in the number of wintering Turnstones, the counts on the Farne Islands and on St. Mary’s Island (both offshore islands) rose during the study period, although the rate of increase was not statistically significant from zero. There were declines at 15 of the 17 non-refuge sites. These results are consistent with the idea that, as populations decline generally, the sites of the highest quality (in this case those subject to less human disturbance) will show no, or slower, declines.
  3. 65% of the walkers interviewed on beaches were exercising their dogs, 83% having travelled 6 km or less to get to the beach. No relationship was found between Turnstone counts and human population densities. There is more information in the paper about the amount of time that people spend on different types of beaches.
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Graph showing Turnstone densities at different distances from refuges on the coast of northeast England. Figure from paper in Bird Study.

 

Implications

The authors of the Bird Study paper have not sought to explain declines in Turnstone numbers, but they have provided some useful references in the Discussion that highlight how improved water treatment and warmer winters might have affected regional distributions. They also remind us that Turnstone numbers are declining – as is the case for several High Arctic species. Having established that there are declines, they use the pattern of change to ask questions about whether disturbance is an issue for this species.

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Seahouses, looking out towards The Farnes – not far, as the Turnstone flies

The results of the research suggest that Turnstones make greater use of relatively undisturbed areas (offshore refuges) than those subject to greater disturbance by humans and their four-legged friends. Previous work has shown that excessive disturbance prevents the use of roosts and that disturbance can have serious energetic consequences (see A place to roost). Although the paper does not distinguish between birds that are foraging or roosting, this study suggests greater provision of undisturbed sites (refuges) within, or close to, protected areas is important for Turnstones, especially if there is also a drive to build more houses and attract more tourists.

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Beaches at Seaburn (County Durham) and Ross Back Sands (Northumberland). Proximity to human settlement makes a big difference! There are 15 dogs in the left-hand picture.

When looking at the planning process for developments close to SPAs, Mark Whittingham and his colleagues suggest that three issues need to be considered in some detail:

  1. While it is valuable to consider the SPA as a whole, it is also important for decision-makers to consider the vulnerabilities of constituent parts of the site.  Thus, for planning decisions based upon environmental impact assessments, there is clearly a need to consider pressures on particularly vulnerable areas, e.g. those used for roosting.
  2. blog tagged

    One of the tagged individuals that was tracked as part of a complementary study

    Studying the behaviour of marked individuals might help to pinpoint areas that are of critical importance. A separate, small-sample study of radio-tagged Turnstones in the area showed that these birds avoided mainland feeding and roosting areas at night, with at least some of the tagged Turnstones being found on offshore sites.

  3. Species need to be considered separately when assessing disturbance issues because habitat use and resource distribution varies widely. The focus for Turnstones is on rocky coasts and this determines their choice of roosting sites. The requirements of red-listed Ringed Plover (for instance) may be very different, especially as they spend a lot of time feeding on the sort of open beaches that look great for exercising dogs.

Paper

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Dogs are an important part of the disturbance issue.

The paper at the heart of this blog is:

Offshore refuges support higher densities and show slower population declines of wintering turnstones by Mark J. Whittingham, Ailsa J.  McKenzie, Richard M. Francksen, David Feige, Tom Cadwallender, Matthew Grainger, Nadheer Fazaa, Caroline Rhymer, Catherine Wilkinson, Pauline Lloyd, Ben Smurthwaite, Steve M. Percival, Tammy Morris-Hale, Clare Rawcliffe, Claire Dewson, Sarah Woods, Gavin B. Stewart & Elizabeth Oughton. Bird Study DOI  10.1080/00063657.2020.1713725


GFA in IcelandGraham (@grahamfappleton) has studied waders for over 40 years and is currently involved in wader research in the UK and in Iceland.  He was Director of Communications at The British Trust for Ornithology until 2013 and is now a freelance writer and broadcaster.

 

 

Wetland Bird Survey: working for waders

Red-listed Curlews, Scottish Oystercatchers, a boom in Black-tailed Godwits and the need for safe roost sites. Here’s a selection of WaderTales blogs that may appeal to counters who contribute to the UK Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) and other birdwatchers who like waders/shorebirds.

Blog RINGOS

It’s over 70 years since UK birdwatchers started to count waders and waterfowl and there are now over 3000 registered Wetland Bird Survey volunteers.

The work that volunteers do to chart the rises and falls of species as diverse as Redshanks and Whooper Swans provides a unique insight into the fortunes of our wintering waterbirds. As a tribute to the people behind the binoculars and telescopes, I highlight seven WaderTales articles that use WeBS data. Click on the links in bold if you want to read a particular story. Link to latest WeBS report.

Curlew counts

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WeBS counts for Curlew in Great Britain between 1974 and 2016

In the blog Is the Curlew really near-threatened? WeBS counts are used to show how numbers have changed over the decades. There might have been a boost in numbers when Curlew came off the hunting quarry list in Great Britain in 1981 but declines in the last 15 years reflect issues birds face in the breeding season in many parts of their European range.

Internationally, Eurasian Curlews are classified as near-threatened and in the UK they are now red listed. WeBS counts in Northern Ireland, alongside I-WeBS counts in the Republic, were successfully used to argue for the cessation of shooting across the island of Ireland in 2012.

Scottish Oystercatchers

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Oystercatchers are unusual, amongst waders, in that they feed their young

Surely the Oystercatcher is one wader species that we don’t need to worry about? Although the blog Oystercatcher: from shingle beach to roof-top leads with nesting behaviour, WeBS counts are used to illustrate regional trends in different parts of the United Kingdom. In Scotland, there is concern about poor breeding success, while in parts of Wales and England, WeBS counts may provide a way of measuring the population-level effects of cockle fishing and diseases affecting shellfish.

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Three very different trajectories for national WeBS counts for Oystercatchers since 1974

Mid-winter movements

figureThe annual WeBS report highlights the months in which counts are at their highest in different estuaries. For Knot, for instance, the highest counts on the Wash are in September, in other east-coast estuaries and on the Dee the peak is in December, whilst further north, in Morecambe Bay and the Solway, top numbers occur in January and February.

In Godwits & Godwiteers, which focuses on the superb work of observers who track the movements of colour-ringed Black-tailed Godwits, WeBS counts from east coast estuaries and the Ouse Washes illustrate the move inland that occurs as the winter progresses.

National patterns and local counts

blogGroups of WeBS counters who cover local estuaries will be the first to notice changes in the numbers of the key species that use their own sites. If the number of Dunlin drops, is that a local phenomenon or part of a national picture? Is there always a strong link between national declines (or increases) and site-based counts? Interpreting changing wader counts provides some answers. It emphasises just how reluctant waders are to change wintering sites between years.

High-tide roosts

horse-and-flockEvery WeBS counter will appreciate the value of a safe (undisturbed) roosting site, whether this be used by waders or by ducks and geese. In A place to roost, WeBS counts for Black-tailed Godwits are used to assess the national and international importance of an individual roosting site in northwest England. The main thread, however, is about the energy expenditure associated with sleeping (not very much) and travelling to and from a safe roost site (lots). An interesting add-on is the story of what happened to Cardiff’s Redshanks when the estuary was turned into a lake.

New recruits

If adult birds don’t change their winter homes then increases in local populations may well reflect good breeding years for wader species. 2017 was a good year for several species that breed in Iceland, particularly Black-tailed Godwits. T with BTGA great summer for Iceland’s waders puts the year’s productivity into context and gives an update on wader research that is being undertaken by the South Iceland Research Centre (University of Iceland), the University of East Anglia (UK) and the University of Aveiro (Portugal). If you have ever seen a colour-ringed Black-tailed Godwit, Ringed Plover, Oystercatcher or Whimbrel you may well find this interesting.

On the open shore

NEWS tableThe blog News & Oystercatchers was written to promote the Non-estuarine Waterbird Survey of 2015/16, or NEWS-III. There are a lot of waders on the shorelines that link the estuaries that are covered for WeBS and, every few years, volunteers are asked to count these birds. In NEWS-II (2006/07), it was estimated that 87% of Purple Sandpipers were to be found on the open shore (see table) with high numbers of several other species. There’s an initial assessment of the results for NEWS-III in the 2016-17 WeBS report.

Links to blogs mentioned already

Many more to choose from

There are over 40 WaderTales blogs to choose from in this list. Four of these articles might be of particular interest to WeBS counters:

  • knot

    Knot migration

    Which wader, when and why? gives an overview of the migration of waders into, out of and through Britain & Ireland. The patterns help to explain why the peak numbers for Sanderling occur on the Wash in August, on the Dee in November and on the North Norfolk coast in May, for instance.

  • Bar-tailed Godwits: migration & survival  contrasts the different migration patterns of the two races of Bar-tailed Godwits that use British & Irish estuaries and explains the importance of colour-rings in the calculation of survival rates. On the other side of the world, Wader declines in the shrinking Yellow Sea shows how quickly numbers can change if the annual survival probabilities of adults fall. sum plum
  • The not-so-Grey Plover focuses on the Grey or Black-bellied Plover but the real story is about moult. British and Irish estuaries are important to huge numbers of moulting waders. WeBS counters often don’t have time to look at individual birds but, with the right camera, you can learn a lot about waders by checking out the right feathers.

Thank you

Blog Counter 1I use WeBS data a lot – in my blogs and in articles – and I appreciate the tremendous value of data collected each month by thousands of contributors. They monitor the condition of their local patches and have directly contributed to local, national and international reviews of the conservation status of wintering waterbirds. To every current and past WeBS counter – ‘thank you!’

There’s a (large) selection of papers using WeBS data here, on the BTO website. The Wetland Bird Survey is run by the BTO, in partnership with RSPB and JNCC (which acts on behalf of NE, NRW, SNH & DAERA), and in association with WWT.


 GFA in Iceland

WaderTales blogs are written by Graham Appleton, to celebrate waders and wader research.  Many of the articles are based on previously published papers, with the aim of making wader science available to a broader audience.

@grahamfappleton

Flyway from Ireland to Iceland

The Ireland to Iceland air link opens in February and does not close until well into May, as swans, geese, ducks, waders, gulls and passerines head north. At the end of June it opens again, with the first failed breeders returning to Ireland. Species such as Oystercatcher and Black-tailed Godwit spend much more of the year in Ireland than they do in Iceland.

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Most Oystercatchers are being ringed with two letter engraved rings, along with two colour-rings: Photo Tómas Gunnarsson

The island of Ireland holds important populations of waders in the wintertime – everything from Grey Plovers from Siberia to Turnstones from Canada – but there is  special relationship with Iceland. It’s the next stopping off point for passage Sanderling, as they fly from Africa to Greenland, and the ultimate destination for lots of wintering birds such as Snipe, Redshank and Golden Plovers.

Oystercatchers lead the way

A lot of the Oystercatchers seen around Ireland’s coastline breed in Iceland, as has been shown by the Dublin Bay Birds Project. Birds start moving north very early, as shown by the appearance of yellow-ringed Dublin Bay birds in Tiree before the end of February each year. Migratory decisions for Icelandic Oystercatchers explains how a new Icelandic project is examining the costs and benefits of being a migrant. Irish reports of Icelandic colour-ringed birds are helping to provide answers – and the Dublin Bay birds are providing great additional data. The first paper to come out of this project is summarised in Which Icelandic Oystercatchers cross the Atlantic?

snipe-1Each autumn, Irish-breeding Snipe are joined by much larger numbers from the north and east. About a quarter of foreign-ringed snipe that have been found in the island of Ireland are of Icelandic origin, compared to just one out of 255 in England. Snipe & Jack Snipe in the UK and Ireland compares the migratory strategies of the two species and laments the decline of Common Snipe, as a breeding species.

whimbrel-mig-fig1Some of the later waders to use the Ireland to Iceland flyway are Whimbrels, many of which stop off in Ireland on spring migration. Whimbrels on the move summarises a paper about the movements of Icelandic, ringed Whimbrel. Since its publication, a new paper has shown that Whimbrel are able to fly between Iceland and west Africa in one jump but that they sometimes need to stop off on the way north. See Very rapid long-distance sea crossing by a migratory bird by José Alves and colleagues and Iceland to Africa non-stop by Camilo Carneiro and colleagues. Camilo has shown that individual birds leave Africa at the same time each year so it is not surprising that spring passage in Ireland is so consistent in its timing (Whimbrel: time to leave).

Black tailed-Godwits

WaderTales was invented as a way of providing feedback to colour-ring readers who focused on Black-tailed Godwits. There are 19 blogs about the species, some of which may well appeal to birdwatchers who have spotted colour-ringed birds anywhere between Belfast Harbour and the Shannon Estuary.

pairs-mapWe are all aware that migration is getting earlier but how does this happen? Monitoring the annual arrival of individual colour-ringed Black-tailed Godwits in Iceland may well have provided an answer. Why is spring migration getting earlier? reveals that it is new recruits into the breeding population that are setting the pace; they are reaching Iceland earlier than previous generations.

Another fascinating story that is revealed by colour-ringing is the synchronous arrival in Iceland of the two members of breeding pairs of Black-tailed Godwits, even if one wintered in Ireland and the other in France. You can read more here.

Wintering waders

Ireland is a very important winter destination for Iceland’s Redshank, Golden Plover and Snipe. You can read more in Ireland’s wintering waders, a blog based on the most recent population estimates for the island of Ireland, generated from WeBS data in Northern Ireland and I-WeBS in the Republic. A paper in Irish Birds revealed a 20% drop in wader numbers over a five-year period. One of the biggest declines was in Redshank, most of which will be of Icelandic origin. We don’t really know what is happening to winter numbers of Golden Plover or Snipe.

Greenland and Canada

Each spring, thousands of waders pass through Ireland on their way from Africa to Iceland, and beyond to Greenland and Canada. By the end of the first week of May, most of the waders that breed in Iceland (Black-tailed Godwit, Whimbrel, Redshank, Oystercatcher, Snipe and Golden Plover) will be on territory but birds headed further north are on a later schedule.

blog 4 IcelandThe month of May sees departures of Sanderling, Turnstone and Knot that have spent the winter around the coasts of Ireland. Before they go, their numbers will be swelled with the addition of newly-arrived flocks from Africa and southern Europe. The blog Travel advice for Sanderling, reveals fascinating research results about Sanderling migration, generated by thousands of reports of colour-ringed birds. Why do some Sanderling travel all the way from Greenland to South Africa when they could do just as well by staying in Ireland?

Most of these May-departure flocks of waders, which also include Dunlin and Ringed Plover, will stop off in Iceland to refuel and to await good conditions for the next stage of their journeys to the Arctic.

Breeding Waders

WaderTales were developed in East Anglia so many of the articles about breeding waders have an English feel to them. Hopefully, some of the blogs will still appeal. Anyone trying to support breeding Lapwing populations might be interested in A helping hand for Lapwings, which also talks about Redshank. In a more recent blog, Tool-kit for wader conservation, there’s a summary of techniques available to conservationists who focus on waders breeding on lowland wet grassland.

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There’s an Icelandic focus to WaderTales too and a blog, which looks at the attitudes of farmers. This may well resonate with conservationists (scientists, birdwatchers and farmers) who are trying to work together to improve conditions for Irish breeding waders. As Icelandic farming expands, what are farmers prepared to do to support breeding waders, many of which are destined to spend the winter on Irish estuaries. See: Do Iceland’s farmers care about wader conservation?

Ireland – a special place for Curlews

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Curlews fly vast distances to spend the winter on the estuaries of Britain & Ireland (© Graham Catley)

Is the Curlew really near-threatened? considers the plight of breeding Curlew. It’s easy to understand why BirdWatch Ireland, RSPB, BTO, WWT and GWCT  are focusing on this species How long will it be until breeding Curlew are lost from Ireland, completely?

The threat to the Curlew is real, especially when set in an international context. Two species of curlew are probably already extinct and other members of the Numeniini (curlews, godwits and Upland Sandpiper) are facing a similar set of problems to those that probably caused the demise of the Eskimo Curlew and Slender-billed Curlew. Why are we losing our large waders? outlines the background to a global problem.

There’s a WaderTales blog that summarises a paper from BTO and RSPB – Curlews can’t wait for a treatment plan. Although the analyses are based on British data, the results are highly relevant to Irish Curlews.  If you prefer your Curlew writing to be more lyrical, please read Curlew Moon which has it its heart the similarly titled book by Mary Colwell.

A more recent Curlew blog reveals the results of the Irish breeding survey in the summers of 2015, 2016 & 2017, with the shocking headline figure of a 96% decline: Ireland’s Curlew Crisis.

Conservation issues

Hundreds of  birdwatchers take part in the Irish Wetland Bird Survey (Republic) and the Wetland Bird Survey (Northern Ireland). These counts identify and monitor key sites for wintering waders – and wildfowl. Whilst mud  and sand-flats are, of course, important to waders, so are roost sites. A place to roost discusses the importance of safe, high-tide roosts, especially in terms of energetics. It has been estimated that the cost of flying to and from roosts might account for up to 14% of a bird’s daily energy expenditure. That’s something to think about next time you see a dog chasing off a flock of roosting waders. This blog about Disturbed Turnstone suggests that pressures from people (and dogs) can cause a redistribution of wintering birds.

Further reading

b-stubble-godwitsHopefully, this summary  gives a flavour of some of the issues being faced by Irish waders and the research to which they are contributing. There are already over 90 blogs in the WaderTales series, with one or two new blogs being produced each month. If you want to know how volcanoes affect breeding waders in Iceland, why Black-tailed Godwits wear colour-rings or if there are costs to carrying a geolocator have a look here.

And finally …

There’s a useful summary about wader migration to, from and through Ireland in Which wader, when and why?

GFA in Iceland

Graham (@grahamfappleton) has studied waders for over 40 years and is currently involved in wader research in the UK and in Iceland.  He was Director of Communications at The British Trust for Ornithology until 2013 and is now a freelance writer and broadcaster.

Wales: a special place for waders

From winter beaches to summer moorland and woodland, Wales provides essential habitats for waders. 

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There are over eighty WaderTales blogs so far. Here’s a selection that may well appeal to birdwatchers in Wales.

Winter beaches & estuaries

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Most Oystercatchers are being ringed with two letter engraved rings, along with two colour-rings: Photo Tómas Gunnarsson

Wales holds important populations of waders in the wintertime – everything from Bar-tailed Godwits from Siberia to Turnstones from Canada. Some of the Oystercatchers seen in sites such as the Burry Inlet or the Menai Strait are from Iceland, where they can be found alongside Redshanks and Golden Plover that have also arrived from the north. They emphasise the close links between Wales and Iceland when it come to birdlife.

Migratory decisions for Icelandic Oystercatchers explains how a new project is examining the costs and benefits of being a migrant. Welsh reports of Icelandic colour-ringed birds are helping to provide answers. Here’s a blog about the first paper: Which Oystercatchers cross the Atlantic?

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snipe-1Interestingly, while there are similar links between Ireland and Iceland, the migratory provenance of Welsh Snipe may be very different to that of Irish ones. A quarter of foreign-ringed Snipe reported in Ireland have been found to be wearing Icelandic rings but, so far, no Reykjavik-ringed Snipe have been spotted in Wales. Snipe & Jack Snipe in the UK and Ireland compares the migratory strategies of the two species and laments the decline of Common Snipe, as a breeding species.

Protecting key wintering sites is a high priority when it comes to wader conservation. A recent BTO and WWT project aims to provide better information as to how species as diverse as Dunlin and Shelduck make use of the Severn Estuary. This is important work, with major relevance to discussions as to how power might be generated within the estuary. Tracking waders on the Severn urges birdwatchers to look for colour-marked birds. Initial results, shared at a recent International Wader Study Group conference, indicate that the home range of a Redshank is ten times as big as originally thought. It will be interesting to see what else this study reveals.

horse-and-flockHundreds of Welsh birdwatchers take part in the Wetland Bird Survey and the intensive work involved in periodic Low Tide Counts. These identify and monitor key sites and establish the most important feeding sites within estuaries. Whilst mud and sand-flats are, of course, important to waders, so are roost sites. A place to roost discusses the importance of safe, high-tide roosts, especially in terms of energetics. I had not realised that it has been estimated that the cost of flying to and from roosts might account for up to 14% of a bird’s daily energy expenditure. That’s something to think about next time you see a dog chasing off a flock of roosting waders.

This blog reveals the latest trends in numbers of Britain’s wintering waders: Do population estimates matter? Most species are less numerous but the Black-tailed Godwit bucks the trend. Warmer British winters may be providing easier conditions for these smart waders but this paper shows how spring conditions in Iceland are driving the trend: From local warming to range expansion.

Passing through

whimbrel-mig-fig1There is exciting work going on in Wales, to understand why so many Whimbrel spend time in the country in the spring. Whimbrels on the move summarises a paper about the movements of Icelandic, ringed Whimbrel. Since its publication, a new paper has shown that Whimbrel are able to fly between Iceland and west Africa in one jump but that they usually need to stop off on the way north. See Iceland to Africa non-stop.

Some waders are more mobile than others. Although both Grey Plover and Knot are ‘winter visitors’, ringing has shown that they move around the estuaries bordering the Irish Sea, during the period from October to April. Colour-ringing studies aim to help us to understand the importance of this network of sites to Knot from Canada and Greenland and Grey Plover from Siberia. Welsh birdwatchers can help by reporting birds wearing lettered flags on their legs.

Each spring, Welsh beaches see influxes of Sanderling, Ringed Plover, Turnstone and Dunlin, as birds pass through on their way from Africa to Iceland, Greenland and Canada. Some of the smart summer-plumage Sanderling could have travelled from South Africa, Senegal or Portugal but others spend the winter in Wales. This fascinating paper gives Travel advice to Sanderling.

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There’s a blog on the subject of wader migration if you want a quick summary for 40 or more species: Which wader, when and why?

Breeding Waders

Wales provides homes to many breeding waders, from Ringed Plover on the coast, via Little Ringed Plover and Commons Sandpiper along rivers and into the moorland for Curlew and Dunlin, passing a forest with Woodcock en route. And that’s only giving a mention to half of the country’s breeding wader species.

CattleStarting on salt-marsh, Big-foot and the Redshank nest investigates appropriate cattle stocking levels for successful Redshank breeding. Although the work was undertaken in northwest England, there is no reason to believe that Welsh cattle are any less careful as to where they put their feet. This paper shows that salt-marsh Redshank are in trouble: Redshank -the warden of the marshes.

We are all aware of the issues facing farmland waders. The next blog is about research in Scotland but the story it tells, of declining numbers of species such as Redshank and Lapwing, could ave been written about Wales. Here, you can read how farming has changed and the impacts that this has had upon breeding waders: 25 years of wader declines.

Spring sees the return of Common Sandpipers from Africa, to nest along Welsh rivers and around reservoirs. Not-so-Common Sandpipers  describes the migration and decline of this much-loved species.

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Curlews fly vast distances to spend the winter on the estuaries of Britain & Ireland (© Graham Catley)

Is the Curlew really near-threatened? considers the plight of breeding Curlew. It’s easy to understand why RSPB, BTO, GWCT and BirdWatch Ireland are focusing on this species. You can read about Ireland’s Curlew Crisis here. The Welsh decline is not as serious as the one in Ireland, where the number of breeding pairs has dropped from 3300 to 138 pairs, but you still have to ask: How long will it be until breeding Curlew are lost from Wales?

This blog summarises the threats to breeding Curlew across Great Britain: Curlews can’t wait for a treatment plan.

Research by RSPB in Wales has focused on specific issues relating to grazing: Sheep numbers and Welsh Curlews.

Predation is acknowledged as a major issue for Curlew but is this going to be a problem for Oystercatchers too? Oystercatchers: from shingle beach to roof-tops reveals a significant decline of the species in Scotland, mediated to some extent by range expansion in three dimensions. There’s a specific mention of the Burry Inlet control programme of the 1970s.

The strangest Welsh wader has to be the Woodcock – probing about in winter fields and nesting in forestry plantations. Conserving British-breeding Woodcock focuses on worrying results from the latest GWCT/BTO survey and work to reduce losses during the shooting season.

Further reading

Hopefully, this summary  gives a flavour of some of the issues being faced by Welsh waders and the research to which they are contributing. There are already over 80 blogs in the WaderTales series, with one or two new blogs being produced each month. If you want to know more about wader migration or moult, how volcanoes affect breeding waders in Iceland, why Black-tailed Godwits wear colour-rings or if there are costs to carrying a geolocator have a look here.

blog oyc godwit


GFA in IcelandGraham (@grahamfappleton) has studied waders for over 40 years and is currently involved in wader research in the UK and in Iceland.  He was Director of Communications at The British Trust for Ornithology until 2013 and is now a freelance writer and broadcaster.

WaderTales: a taste of Scotland

11 Dec RK LWhy is Scotland losing its breeding waders? The latest WaderTales blog with a Scottish flavour is a story from Strathallan, based on observations by Mike Bell.

“If you’ve taken the A9 north of Stirling, through Strathallan, perhaps you might have noticed displaying Lapwing, Oystercatcher, Curlew and Redshank? Over a 25-year period, the number of breeding waders in this valley and another one that runs northwest and that can be seen from the B827 has dropped from 600 pairs to just 76 – that’s a loss of 87%, or over 20 pairs per year.”

Click here for a link to the blog

 

And here are five more uniquely Scottish WaderTales blogs

headerWaiting for the wind – spring flocks of Black-tailed Godwit on Scotland Observations from Tiree by John Bowler and others gave a unique insight into what happens if northerly winds set in at migration time.

scottish-wadertalesEstablishing breeding requirements of Whimbrel  focuses on the different habitat needs of adults and chicks in Shetland.

Oystercatchers: from shingle beach to roof-tops details significant declines in Scotland, at least partly explained by predation. An increasing number have now taken to nesting on roofs.

UK Dotterel numbers have fallen by 57% presents the results of an RSPB survey that was published in Bird Study.

Prickly problems for waders explains how SNH are trying to deal with introduced Hedgehogs in the Outer Hebrides, where they are a major problem for breeding waders.

And here are another nine which may well appeal to Scottish birdwatchers:

  • NEWS and Oystercatchers focuses on the waders that  winter on coasts, instead of estuaries. It was written to promote the 205/16 coastal survey run by BTO.
  • A place to roost discusses the importance of safe, high-tide roosts, especially in terms of energetics. What are waders looking for?
  • The not-so-Grey Plover focuses on the moult of the Grey Plover but the principles are relevant to determining the ages of birds of other species.

There are over 40 WaderTales blogs. The intention is to add one or two new blogs each month. You can sign up to receive an e-mail notification when a new one is published.


GFA in IcelandGraham (@grahamfappleton) has studied waders for over 40 years and is currently involved in wader research in the UK and in Iceland.  He was Director of Communications at The British Trust for Ornithology until 2013 and is now a freelance writer and broadcaster.

A place to roost

Safe roost sites are important for waders such as Black-tailed Godwits

top-picIt has been said that Black-tailed Godwits are the laziest birds in the world, usually in a frustrated tone while waiting for a marked bird to wake up and reveal the rest of its colour rings. Roosting is not laziness, however; it’s an important resource conservation strategy in the daily balance of energy inputs and outputs.

When Black-tailed Godwits are feeding in tidal systems they have a limited amount of time each day to access the shellfish and worms that make up their diet. These foods are unavailable over the high-tide period, and sometimes in the lull between the ebb and flood, so birds conserve energy by gathering together at roosts. They seek out sites that are safe and sheltered, and then go to sleep – often for several hours if undisturbed. Theunis Piersma and colleagues have shown that sleep is the most energy efficient form of activity for shorebirds.

In two interesting papers, focusing on Red Knot and Great Knot in Roebuck Bay, North-Western Australia, Danny Rogers and colleagues showed that choice of roost sites seems to involve several criteria:

  • Birds try to find a roost as close as possible to feeding sites, probably to reduce travel costs between feeding areas and high-tide roosts.
  • In particular, birds appear to turn down feeding opportunities that take them further from preferred roost sites.
  • Open roosting sites that provide clear views of any approaching predators seem to be preferred
  • Availability of safe night-time roosts seems to be more restricted, with birds flying further to find a suitable site to wait out the high tide period.
  • The estimated ‘commuting costs’ associated with flying to and from these roosts accounted for between 2% and 8% of daily energy expenditure.
  • Flocks of Knot that were disturbed at roosts and forced to fly around for thirty minutes had an estimated increase in their daily energy expenditure of c 13%.
  • roosting-curlew

    These Curlew, roosting on the shores of the Humber, are minimising energy expenditure in very cold conditions

    Temperatures in Roebuck Bay can frequently exceed 38⁰C, and the waders chose wet sites in which they could keep their feet and legs cool. That’s not a problem for waders wintering in the UK.

The details can be found here:

What does this mean for Black-tailed Godwit in UK conditions?

turnstone-header

Waders often roost in mixed flocks. These birds are resting on an Icelandic beach after crossing the Atlantic

Although the facts, figures and conclusions listed above relate to Red Knot and Great Knot, the authors point out that they gather in mixed roosts with other species to which similar decision-making might apply. The Australian studies took place in very hot conditions but many of the factors influencing roosting site choice are likely to also apply to our cold and wind-swept estuaries in NW Europe. For instance, a study of Knot on the Dee Estuary by Mitchell et al in England estimated that costs of commuting to roosts could account for 14% of daily energy expenditure.

energy-figEnergetic constraints are likely to present different issues for arctic waders that spend the non-breeding season in the northern hemisphere than for ones that choose to cross the equator, and experience warmer conditions and heat stress. Even within Europe, the energetic balances that waders can experience on different estuaries can vary widely. In their 2013 Ecology paper on Black-tailed Godwit energetics, Costs, benefits, and fitness consequences of different migratory strategies  José Alves and colleagues showed that mild weather and abundant food supplies result in a positive energy balance for godwits wintering on the Tagus estuary in Portugal and, to a lesser extent, the estuaries of south Ireland. In east England estuaries, however, the costs of keeping warm can sometimes exceed the energy available from the food supplies (see figure). In such circumstances, an undisturbed roost, located as close as possible to feeding areas may well be especially important.

Consequences of roost loss

redshank

Colour-marked Redshank demonstrated the individual consequences of habitat loss

Although it is very hard to demonstrate population-level consequences of removing roosting sites, we have some clues about how birds respond to removal of roosts and foraging sites, from impact-assessment work carried out by the BTO on Redshank in the Cardiff Bay area. When this bay was closed and flooded for commercial development, Redshanks lost both feeding areas and traditional roosting sites. Tracking of colour-ringed Redshanks showed that displaced birds moved to new feeding areas and roost sites up to 19 km away, but mostly stayed close-by, on the mudflats of the River Rhymney. Cannon-net catches of these flocks provided measurements of bird mass before and after the closure of the Bay, which revealed that adult Redshank from the Bay had difficulty in maintaining body condition in the first winter following closure and that their survival rates in subsequent winters remained lower than birds that had previously been settled in the Rhymney area. Three papers are essential reading for anyone interested in the consequences of displacements caused by development projects.

ynrx-for-blogA key point of both the Knot work in Australia and the Redshank impact assessment study in Wales is the energetic costs to individuals that can result from the disruption caused by the loss of roosting or foraging sites. Indeed, individual waders may even have favoured locations within roosts that they consistently use. For example, at Gilroy Nature Park, a shallow pool where up to 3500 of the Black-tailed Godwits that feed on the Dee estuary in NW England regularly gather to roost, observers of colour-ringed birds have noticed that marked individual godwits (eg YN-RX pictured here) are often seen in exactly the same place within the pool and flock.  Losing a roosting site of which individuals have such detailed knowledge, and forcing flocks of birds to find alternative roosting locations, may therefore have bigger consequences than just the kilometres covered.

Importance of individual sites

mapThe total number of Icelandic Black-tailed godwits was estimated to be 47,000 in 2004, a figure that is likely to be closer to 60,000 now as the population has continued to grow. This means that a flock of 3,000 birds represents about 5% of the total of the entire breeding population. There is a small number of sites across the United Kingdom that hold these sorts of numbers at different stages of the year. According to the latest figures from the Wetland Bird Survey, numbers on the Wash and Humber estuaries in east England peak at averages of 8198 and 3413 in September, there are 4339 Black-tailed Godwits on the Welsh side of the Dee estuary in October and 5909 on the English side in November. The mean count on the Thames also peaks in November (5883). As the winter progresses, numbers on the nearby Ribble estuary rise to a mean of 4234 in January, there is a mean maximum of 3236 on the Washes in February and 3191 on the Blackwater in March. Although all of these sites are important to Icelandic Black-tailed Godwits throughout the non-breeding period, the different timing of peak counts illustrates the reliance of Icelandic birds on a network of sites. To get a feel for the range of strategies used by individual birds, see Godwits and Godwiteers.

Conservation

horse-and-flock

Roosting Black-tailed  Godwits at Gilroy Nature Reserve share their pool with a horse and Canada Geese

While estuarine feeding areas across Europe are well safeguarded, through the network of Special Protection Areas, roost sites are not always as well served, especially if birds spend the high tide period on sites outside the SPA boundary of their foraging areas, such as the freshwater pool at Gilroy Nature Reserve, inland of the Dee Estuary. Some roost sites such as North Killingholme Haven Pits on the Humber have been included within a designated SPA formed by the adjacent mudflats but others, such as Gilroy, are discrete sites outside the SPA. Maintaining the wader populations that forage on our estuarine mudflats may depend upon our capacity to protect their safe roosting sites, even if they are not currently designated.


GFA in Iceland

WaderTales blogs are written by Graham Appleton, to celebrate waders and wader research.  Many of the articles are based on previously published papers, with the aim of making wader science available to a broader audience.

@grahamfappleton