Introducing WaderTales

WaderTales blogs are used to celebrate waders and wader research.  Many of the articles will be based on previously published papers, with the aim of making wader science available to a broader audience.

The choice of topics will reflect personal interests, so there will be plenty about Black-tailed Godwits and the international team of scientists who study their behaviours and life-histories.  I hope that these blogs will be of particular interest to the hundreds of people who contribute their sightings of colour-ringed Black-tailed Godwits to the ever-expanding database of movements.

The first blog appeared on Monday 28 September, telling the story of why areas of Iceland that have been subject to higher deposits of volcanic dust can support up to three times as many waders as those that have received least.

Photo: Tómas Gunnarsson

Photo: Tómas Gunnarsson

On 2 October the second blog outlined new research which aims to explain why some Icelandic Oystercatchers migrate while others stay in Iceland – and how this might impact upon our understanding of how migration patterns change.  As this project unfolds, colour-ring sightings from birdwatchers are once more going to be very important.

By the end of October I hope that there will be a piece on the Black-tailed Godwits of Cley and another on the RSPB’s research into Lapwing predation.

Comments and suggestions will always be welcome.

Graham Appleton

GFA in Iceland

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