WaderTales: a taste of Scotland

11 Dec RK LWhy is Scotland losing its breeding waders? The latest WaderTales blog with a Scottish flavour is a story from Strathallan, based on observations by Mike Bell.

“If you’ve taken the A9 north of Stirling, through Strathallan, perhaps you might have noticed displaying Lapwing, Oystercatcher, Curlew and Redshank? Over a 25-year period, the number of breeding waders in this valley and another one that runs northwest and that can be seen from the B827 has dropped from 600 pairs to just 76 – that’s a loss of 87%, or over 20 pairs per year.”

Click here for a link to the blog

 

And here are five more uniquely Scottish WaderTales blogs

headerWaiting for the wind – spring flocks of Black-tailed Godwit on Scotland Observations from Tiree by John Bowler and others gave a unique insight into what happens if northerly winds set in at migration time.

scottish-wadertalesEstablishing breeding requirements of Whimbrel  focuses on the different habitat needs of adults and chicks in Shetland.

Oystercatchers: from shingle beach to roof-tops details significant declines in Scotland, at least partly explained by predation. An increasing number have now taken to nesting on roofs.

UK Dotterel numbers have fallen by 57% presents the results of an RSPB survey that was published in Bird Study.

Prickly problems for waders explains how SNH are trying to deal with introduced Hedgehogs in the Outer Hebrides, where they are a major problem for breeding waders.

And here are another nine which may well appeal to Scottish birdwatchers:

  • NEWS and Oystercatchers focuses on the waders that  winter on coasts, instead of estuaries. It was written to promote the 205/16 coastal survey run by BTO.
  • A place to roost discusses the importance of safe, high-tide roosts, especially in terms of energetics. What are waders looking for?
  • The not-so-Grey Plover focuses on the moult of the Grey Plover but the principles are relevant to determining the ages of birds of other species.

There are over 40 WaderTales blogs. The intention is to add one or two new blogs each month. You can sign up to receive an e-mail notification when a new one is published.


GFA in IcelandGraham (@grahamfappleton) has studied waders for over 40 years and is currently involved in wader research in the UK and in Iceland.  He was Director of Communications at The British Trust for Ornithology until 2013 and is now a freelance writer and broadcaster.

Snipe & Jack Snipe in the UK and Ireland

This blog first appeared as an article in Shooting Times and Country magazine. It has been amended to provide more web links.

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A wisp of Common Snipe

There’s a big difference between the number of Common Snipe and Jack Snipe we see in the United Kingdom each winter, with an estimated 1,100,000 of the former and 110,000 of the latter, according to the authors of Population Estimates of Bird in Great Britain and the United Kingdom. They remind us that Jack Snipe are hard to find and identify and warn that the total of 110,000 is a contender for ‘least reliable’ of the hundreds that have been compiled for this mammoth stock-take.

comparisonIn theory, therefore, for every ten Common Snipe we see we ought to see one Jack Snipe. Telling them apart is mostly a matter of size (see table) and there’s a useful identification video that has been produced by the British Trust for Ornithology. Both species make good use of their striped, cryptic plumage to avoid detection but Jack Snipe take the art to the next level, hiding against or under a tussock until the last possible moment and then exploding from beneath a person’s feet. Given the closeness of approach, perhaps Jack Snipes might be more obvious and their numbers exaggerated?

Jack Snipe

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Jack Snipe probing in mud

In the winter months, Jack Snipe are not as closely associated with wetlands as are Common Snipe, preferring longer vegetation, such as that to be found in muddy, cow-poached rough grazing marsh, to the open edges of larger bodies of water. For the tiny Jack Snipe, a cow’s hoof-print forms an ideal pool in which to probe. One of the areas that birdwatchers go to see Jack Snipe is Glasgow. Strange though it may seem, several of the wetland areas within the city limits hold small numbers of birds, especially in autumn, when migrating Jack Snipe pass through Britain, on their way from Scandinavia to wintering areas in south-west Europe. Members of the local ringing group have focused a lot of effort on this species, catching individuals by dragging a mist-net through the rough, wet, reedy grassland and ringing birds that have jumped from the ground as the net passed over them. See blog by Gillian Dinsmore.

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Jack Snipe are relatively long-winged

Jack Snipe are well designed for migration, with much bigger wings for the size of the body than the Snipe. Unlike Common Snipe, many of which migrate in flocks, or wisps, Jack Snipe are thought to travel mostly alone and at night. They cover long distances, with some birds from Russia crossing the Sahara and those from eastern areas of Siberia travelling to eastern Africa, India and southern coastal countries of mainland Asia. The birds that winter in the British Isles have much less far to travel than the majority of the population, therefore.

Wintering Common Snipe

Common Snipe, which are much bigger and more common than Jack Snipe, start to appear in their wintering areas as early as August. The pioneering birds are juveniles; most adults moulting at least some of their flight feathers before flying south and west in September and October. We know this because many French hunters have provided wings to scientists studying the age and sex structure of the population in that country. Moulting is an energetically expensive part of any bird’s life, so autumn feeding conditions are presumably generally good enough for moult to have been at least started, if not finished, before birds leave the breeding areas. Not every bird manages to fit in a full moult before it’s time to move south, however, with one in six adults shot in France found to be in suspended moult, having shed and moulted some primary feathers before migration, with a view to completion in the wintering grounds. A slightly smaller number have a mixed age of secondary flight feathers and about a quarter delay completion of covert moult.

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Common Snipe

Although most of the Common Snipe we see in Britain in the wintertime have come from Scandinavia and mainland Europe, Ireland has a strong additional connection to Iceland. A quarter of foreign-ringed Common Snipe discovered in Ireland or Northern Ireland have been found to be wearing Icelandic rings, compared to 1 out of 255 in England, none in Wales and just 10% in Scotland. This and lots of other fascinating facts about migration come to light because hunters kindly send information about ringed birds to The British Trust for Ornithology, which is ‘mission control’ for ringing in both the UK and Ireland. This information is available on-line via the BTO website.

Across Europe, although there is almost certainly a decline in the number of Common Snipe, probably linked to man’s incessant drive to drain wetlands, there is no suggestion as yet that Common Snipe should be added to the list of species of conservation concern.

Snipe breeding in Britain & Ireland

British and Irish Snipe are in trouble. By the time of the first national bird surveys, some 50 years ago, we had been turning wetlands into farmland for as much as 2000 years and, since then, numbers of Common Snipe may well have fallen by a further 90% in the areas in which they are still breeding. There has been a major shrinkage of the species’ range since 1968-72. Losses are shown as downward triangles in the map from the latest Bird Atlas, published by the British Trust for Ornithology. The rate of decline across England, Wales, southern Scotland and much of Ireland in the shorter period since 1988-91 emphasises just how quickly the species is being lost. It can only be a matter of time until Common Snipe is added to the red list of species of conservation concern in the UK, in order to highlight the perilous plight of our breeding population.

Update: although we have last large number of Snipe over centuries, the latest figures from the Breeding Bird Survey indicate a 26% increase between 1995 and 2018. The species is still thinly spread and the confidence interval associated with this 26% estimate is large – somewhere between 4% and 55%.

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drumming-snipe

Displaying Common Snipe

A displaying Common Snipe is a magical thing – flying around with real purpose, climbing into the sky and vibrating its tail feathers in a stooping descent. Our grandparents could have heard them drumming on grazing marshes anywhere in the country and just imagine what the fens of eastern England must have been like 500 years ago. These days, most people in southern Britain will have to visit a nature reserve even to have a chance to share that same magic. I am lucky enough to go to Iceland every summer, where I can still easily see a dozen Common Snipe displaying at the same time above areas of wet grassland.  If you want anything like the same sort of experience in the UK, you’ll probably need to travel to the Outer Hebrides.


GFA in Iceland

WaderTales blogs are written by Graham Appleton, to celebrate waders and wader research.  Many of the articles are based on previously published papers, with the aim of making wader science available to a broader audience.

@grahamfappleton

All downhill for upland waders?

 

Are targeted payments for England’s upland farmers benefiting Curlew, Lapwing, Oystercatcher, Redshank and Snipe?

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The farmed land that fringes our moors provides important habitats for breeding waders (Dawn Balmer)

In the period 1995 to 2013, England lost 32% of its breeding Curlew, 31% of its Redshank, 27% of its Lapwing and 14% of its Snipe*, according to the latest Breeding Bird Survey results. The uplands are the main stronghold for Curlew and hold (or used to hold?) significant numbers of the other three declining species. Is the story one of total gloom or are there areas where sensitive farm management and agri-environment payments are successfully supporting waders and other species associated with upland farms? A new survey, funded by Defra and coordinated by BTO aims to find some answers.

* Please note that the figures for population changes have not been updated. They all relate to the period 1995 to 2013. Latest figures can be found by following the link to the BBS results (see above).

The snappily-titled Breeding Waders of English Upland Farmland survey starts in April and volunteers are still needed in many areas. Please visit the BTO website if you may be able to help.

More about the key species:

curle 004 (nest) (Derek Belsey) (A)

Derek Belsey

Curlew (recent 32% decline in England). The species is globally defined as near-threatened and has been added to the red list of conservation concern in the UK. Losses have been particularly severe in Ireland, Northern Ireland and Wales but the distribution is shrinking in England. There’s a WaderTales blog about Curlew here. Is the Curlew really ‘near-threatened’?

Lapwing (recent 27% decline in England). Most of the work to try to understand recent declines in Lapwing numbers has been undertaken on lowland wet grassland, where cooperative mobbing of predators is an important part of the daily routine for parents. In the uplands, where breeding densities are lower, it would not be surprising if predation pressures could be impeding species recovery. There are two WaderTales blogs about these issues. A helping hand for Lapwings and How well do Lapwings and Redshanks grow?

redsh 058 e (Jill Pakenham) (A)

Jill Pakenham

Redshank (recent 31% decline in England). The situation for Redshank is very similar to that for Lapwing, the presence of which may help in predator defence. There is a WaderTales blog about the special issues in the Uists (NW Scotland), where introduced hedgehogs are causing huge problems in this key wader hot-spot. Prickly problems for breeding waders

Snipe (recent 14% decline in England). The survey methods used in the new BWEUF survey are not designed to detect Snipe, which are mostly active at dusk, but the visits should provide useful count and distribution data for an under-researched species.

oyste 066 e (Nigel Clark) (A)

Nigel Clark

Oystercatcher (recent increase of 56% in England). Much of the increase may well be occurring in river valleys and newly created wetlands and gravel pits, rather than in the uplands. We know from the recent Moorland Forum report Understanding Predation that there have been changes in Oystercatcher abundance in much of upland Scotland between 1990 and 2010, potentially linked to predation pressure. It would not be surprising if similar processes operate in the English uplands.

How the BWEUF survey will work

Breeding wader populations in the UK have been a major conservation priority for some years. Declines continue despite the implementation of conservation measures that are designed to deliver appropriate habitats, some of which are supported through agri-environment schemes (AES). While enhanced monitoring of many upland and lowland habitats would be valuable, a particular gap is evident for in-bye farmland. This habitat can be defined as juncus/rush pastures, semi-improved pastures and meadows below the moorland line, although it technically includes all enclosed farmland. Using Defra funding, Natural England has commissioned BTO to run a volunteer-based survey, with RSPB field-staff filling gaps in less accessible areas.

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Photo: Dawn Balmer

This project will assess the importance of in-bye land for waders, by estimating the total numbers present in these habitats, relative to national estimates measured from Bird Atlas 2007-11 data. More importantly, it will set a baseline against which to measure future change in breeding numbers.  This will be used to assess the success of Environmental Stewardship management, as well as to measure differences in numbers between AES and non-scheme habitats for waders that nest and/or forage on in-bye farmland. The survey will use 2×2km grid squares (tetrads), as in Bird Atlas 2007-11. Volunteers are asked to make two morning visits to each tetrad, one between early April and mid-May and a second before mid-July, with a minimum of a two-week gap between visits. On each visit, volunteers will be asked to survey as many as possible of the fields in this in-bye buffer of 1km below the moorland line. They will walk to within 100m of every part of each field to which they have access, recording all birds seen and heard, noting any display or territorial behaviour and mapping the locations of target wader species.

yelwa 015 e (Jill Pakenham) (A) (2)

There’s an opportunity to record other species of conservation concer, such as this red-listed Yellow Wagtail (Jill Pakenham)

The key features of grassland management and structure, along with other land use, which dictate suitability for waders, will be recorded.  Predation has been identified as one potential driver of population decline – or an impediment to species recovery – so observers will be asked to record avian and non-avian predators.

Birdwatchers do not normally spend much time in this in-bye habitat so here’s an opportunity to capture as much information as possible, especially for any other waders and gamebirds (Black Grouse, Grey Partridge, Pheasant, and Red-legged Partridge). Valuable information can be data can be collected for Cuckoo, Linnet, Meadow Pipit, Reed Bunting, Ring Ouzel, Skylark, Stonechat, Twite, Wheatear, Whinchat and Yellow Wagtail, many of which are red-listed species of conservation concern (and bonus birds on a day’s birdwatching). To view further information on survey methodology follow this link.

In Summary

The wader declines quoted in this article use Breeding Bird Survey data from 1995 but there is evidence of longer-term falls for Curlew (55% since 1975), Lapwing (65%), Redshank (65%) and Snipe (90%). These are worrying numbers and it is to be hoped that the BTO can find enough volunteers for BWEUF, despite the fact that many of the survey squares are a long way from the flat-lands in which most English birdwatchers live. Curlews, Lapwings, Oystercatchers, Redshanks and Snipe are counting on us to count them.


 GFA in Iceland

WaderTales blogs are written by Graham Appleton, to celebrate waders and wader research.  Many of the articles are based on previously published papers, with the aim of making wader science available to a broader audience.

@grahamfappleton