Black-tailed Godwit and Curlew in France

In July 2018 there was a call for people to express their opinions on the issue of hunting Black-tailed Godwits and Curlews in France. This blog aimed to bring together some background to inform the discussion. The government decided to maintain the current situation until 30 July 2019: to shoot Curlew in some circumstances but to maintain a ban on shooting Black-tailed Godwits. There will be another review in the summer of 2019.

Problems for large waders

Oct 2017The Numeniini is the group of waders that includes curlews, godwits and the Upland Sandpiper. Globally this group is under threat – two species of curlew are probably already extinct. These long-lived species are threatened by pressures during the breeding season and, in some parts of the world, reduced annual survival.

Click here to read a blog about the threats to large waders.

Conservation of migratory species

The Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) is an intergovernmental treaty dedicated to the conservation of migratory waterbirds and their habitats across Africa, Europe, the Middle East, Central Asia, Greenland and the Canadian Archipelago.

Developed under the framework of the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) and administered by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), AEWA brings together countries and the wider international conservation community in an effort to establish coordinated conservation and management of migratory waterbirds throughout their entire migratory range.

Eurasian Curlew

RC picEurasian Curlews are listed as Near-Threatened by BirdLife/IUCN. Shooting of this species has ceased in western Europe, apart from France. A moratorium (pause) was put in place in France in 2008 but that was amended in 2012 to allow shooting on the coast, which is where many of the Curlews are to be found. Shooting of Curlews ceased in Great Britain in 1981, in Northern Ireland in 2011 and Ireland in 2012. The partial moratorium in France was extended until 30 July 2018 and then to 30 July 2019.

LPO (Ligue pour la Protection des Oiseaux), the BirdLife International partner in France, argue that shooting of Curlew should cease or at least that that there should be another moratorium, for at least three years, covering coastal as well as inland areas.

Jan 2018 extinction riskAn AEWA (Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds) plan of 2015 called for an immediate end to hunting and for an Adaptive Harvest Management process to be set up to recommend if any hunting could be sustained. Continuedcurlews in france shooting in France must surely be in contravention of the international plan? Here’s a link to the AEWA Action Pan for Eurasian Curlew.

Tens of thousands of Curlew spend the winter in France, migrating here from across Northern Europe. The purple dots on the map alongside represent the recovery locations of Curlew ringed in Britain and Ireland. Many of these ringed birds have been found in breeding areas, especially Finland, but there are plenty of reports in coastal France, most of which are birds that have been shot.

Click here to read a blog explaining why we should be worried about Curlews.

Black-tailed Godwit

subspeciesTwo subspecies of Black-tailed Godwit spend time on French estuaries; limosa and islandica. The size of the islandica subspecies is increasing, as the breeding range in Iceland expands (blog about this) but the number of limosa is in rapid decline. Limosa birds that spend time in France breed in the Netherlands and surrounding countries, including a small number that breed in the washes of East Anglia. You can read about the 75% decline in the Dutch breeding population in this blog.

Picture7Agreements signed by partners of AEWA and members of the European Union included a five-year moratorium (pause) in shooting of Black-tailed Godwits in the whole of France. This was extended for a further five years, up until 31 July 2018 and then for one more year, until 30 July 2019.

It is hard (or even impossible) to separate islandica from limosa Back-tailed Godwits and we know that they occur in mixed flocks. Scientists have been colour-marking Black-tailed Godwits of both subspecies for many years and birdwatchers can help to assess the relative threat to limosa by reporting colour-ring sightings. You can read more about the value of colour-ring sightings here:

Godwits & Godwiteers 

Project Godwit

blog ManeaBlack-tailed Godwit is still on the French quarry list but there is an ongoing hunting moratorium (pause) that, as for inland Curlew, ended on 31 July 2018 but was extended to 30 July 2019.

LPO argue that, given that it is not possible to distinguish the two subspecies, Black-tailed Godwit should be removed from the quarry list or, alternatively, that there should at least be another moratorium (of at least three years).

Result of the consultation

As indicated at the start of this blog, a decision was made in July 2018 that nothing would change for another year. There would be a complete ban on the hunting of Black-tailed Godwit in France until 30 July 2019 and permission was granted to continue to hunt coastal Curlew. Link here.

Evidence is being collected by conservation scientists that will hopefully inform the decisions that are made as to what should happen after 30 July 2019.


GFA in Iceland

Graham (@grahamfappleton) has studied waders for over 40 years and is currently involved in wader research in the UK and in Iceland.  He was Director of Communications at The British Trust for Ornithology until 2013 and is now a freelance writer and broadcaster.

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7 thoughts on “Black-tailed Godwit and Curlew in France

  1. Schoolboy French used to good effect as I beat the deadline for comments on the French hunting moratorium. It will have given a French bureaucrat a good laugh if nothing else, but has made me feel better, expressing my opinion. In some ways they are still in the Dark Ages.

    Like

      • Hello. The LPO had brought a case against France at the European Commission on the issues of traditional hunting practices , the hunting of greylags during migration and the hunting of species in bad conservation status including the curlew. Now hoping the case will be successful. All the best. Anne

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Is the Curlew really ‘near-threatened’? | wadertales

  3. Pingback: WaderTales blogs in 2018 | wadertales

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